7

I have a string that looks like this, they are ids in a table:

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9

If someone deletes something from the database, I will need to update the string. I know that doing this it will remove the value, but not the commas. Any idea how can I check if the id has a comma before and after so my string doesn't break?

$new_values = $original_values[0];
$new_values =~ s/$car_id//;

Result: 1,2,,4,5,6,7,8,9 using the above sample (bad). It should be 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,9.

| |
  • 1
    Try s/(?:^|,)$car_id\b// – Wiktor Stribiżew Oct 23 at 20:21
  • @Wiktor Stribiżew, Leaves a leading comma if you delete 1 – ikegami Oct 23 at 20:24
  • @WiktorStribiżew Thank you, this works except if is the first value – Pedro Oct 23 at 20:25
  • Can you safely delete the IDs without checking for complete match? I.d. if you have the ID foo, and you try to remove it with s/foo//, you might partially match foobar or snafoo unless you check that match is complete. – TLP Oct 24 at 9:19
  • If this is a string of comma separated values, based on the database, it might be best to build the string anew when you alter the database. I.e. query the database. Or at least avoid using a regex on the csv string, but instead break down the string into values before checking. – TLP Oct 24 at 9:22
6

You can use

s/^$car_id,|,$car_id\b//

Details

  • ^ - start of string
  • $car_id - variable value
  • , - comma
  • | - or
  • , - comma
  • $car_id - variable value
  • \b - word boundary.
| |
6

To remove the $car_id from the string:

my $car_id = 3;
my $new_values = q{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}; 
$new_values = join q{,}, grep { $_ != $car_id } 
    split /,/, $new_values; 
say $new_values;
# Prints:
# 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,9

If you already removed the id(s), and you need to remove the extra commas, reformat the string like so:

my $new_values = q{,,1,2,,4,5,6,7,8,9,,,}; 
$new_values = join q{,}, grep { /\d/ } split /,/, $new_values; 
say $new_values;
# Prints:
# 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,9
| |
  • @ikegami Thank you for the suggestion to improve the answer by adding the method to remove $car_id (not just remove the extra commas). I added this to the answer, – Timur Shtatland Oct 23 at 20:43
5
s/^\Q$car_id\E,|,\Q$car_id\E\b//

Another approach is to store an extra leading and trailing comma (,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,)

The main benefit is that it makes it easier to search for the id using SQL (since you can search for ,$car_id,). Same goes for editing it.

On the Perl side, you'd use

s/,\K\Q$car_id\E,//    # To remove
substr($_, 1, -1)      # To get actual string
| |
3

Ugly way: use regex to remove the value, then simplify

$new_values = $oringa_value[0];
$new_values =~ s/$car_id//;
$new_values =~ s/,+/,/;

Nice way: split and merge

$new_values = $oringa_value[0];
my @values = split(/,/, $new_values);
my $index = 0;
$index++ until $values[$index] eq $car_id;
splice(@values, $index, 1);
$new_values = join(',', @values);
| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.