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I created 3 files: f1,f2,f3. f1-file I filled with numbers: 12345. Other files (f2,f3) are empty. My objective is to read filenames from console and read from first file using FileInputStream and to write first half of f1 to f2 and second half to f3. So, I suppose that after closing streams, I will get in f2 numbers 1,2 and in f3 numbers 345. I wrote the code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        BufferedReader rd = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        String file1 = rd.readLine();
        String file2 = rd.readLine();
        String file3 = rd.readLine();

        try (
                FileInputStream inputStream1 = new FileInputStream(file1);
                FileOutputStream output2 = new FileOutputStream(file2);
                FileOutputStream output3 = new FileOutputStream(file3);
                ) {

            while (inputStream1.available() > 0) {
                if (inputStream1.available() < inputStream1.getChannel().size() / 2) {
                    output2.write(inputStream1.read());
                } else {
                    output3.write(inputStream1.read());
                }
            }
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

It works, but it works incorrectly. After running the program, I get in f2 only number 5, but in f3 get 1234. Size of inputStream1.getChannel().size() is 6 (though I have only 5 numbers in f1) why? And why output streams works wrong?

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  • 4
    Because (1) you are misusing available() as inidicating end of stream, (2) misusing it to indicate the number of bytes in the stream rather than the number of bytes currently available now to be read without blocking, which is what it actually does, and (3) because you are ignoring the case when read() returns -1, which tells you all three of these things at the same time. Correct version is while ((c = in.read()) != -1) {out.write(c); } where c is an int. But a version involving read(byte[]) and write(byte[], int, int) would run orders of magnitude faster. – user207421 Oct 24 '20 at 8:58
  • @MarquisofLorne you added comment, not answer, that's why I cant choose it in order to close question. I understood about available and your idea, but what about condition when I should detect moment when I copied a half of data? – Iga Oct 24 '20 at 9:24
  • Err, just count the bytes transferred until you get half-way, then switch to another output stream? – user207421 Oct 24 '20 at 9:30
  • @MarquisofLorne thanx – Iga Oct 24 '20 at 9:49
1

You're misusing available(), you should use the newer NIO.2 API, and you're copying 1 byte at a time, which is very slow.

Do it like this:

try (
        InputStream in = Files.newInputStream(Paths.get(file1));
        OutputStream out2 = Files.newOutputStream(Paths.get(file2));
        OutputStream out3 = Files.newOutputStream(Paths.get(file3));
        ) {
    byte[] b = new byte[8192];
    int len;
    
    // Copy first half to file2
    long remain = Files.size(Paths.get(file1)) / 2;
    while (remain > 0 && (len = in.read(b, 0, (int) Math.min(remain, b.length))) > 0) {
        out2.write(b, 0, len);
        remain -= len;
    }
    
    // Copy the rest to file3
    while ((len = in.read(b)) > 0) {
        out3.write(b, 0, len);
    }
}
2
  • thank you very much for answer, but I want to perform this objective without NIO2.API – Iga Oct 24 '20 at 9:26
  • 1
    @Iga Then use new FileInputStream(), new FileOutputStream(), and remain = new File(file1).length() / 2 – Andreas Oct 24 '20 at 9:29

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