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I'm building a web application and giving CSS grids a serious try for the first time (without using a CSS framework like Bootstrap). In various places in my app it makes sense to present tabular data in a good old-fashioned table, at least when the viewport is big enough, like in a desktop browser. For example, like this:

tabular format example

For mobile browsers, the tabular view makes much less sense and instead I'd like to take the same data and present it in more of a full-screen width list of cards, something like this:

card format example

I'm not married to the underlying HTML for this being <table> based, but it makes a lot of sense to me to build the page this way for semantic and accessibility purposes.

<table class="data-list">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th>Day</th>
            <th>Date</th>
            <th>Time</th>
            <th>Event</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>Friday</td>
            <td>October 23</td>
            <td>8:00pm</td>
            <td>Event A</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>Saturday</td>
            <td>October 24</td>
            <td>10:00am</td>
            <td>Event B</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

Ultimately, I'd like to be able to apply different CSS to the same underlying html based solely on a media query in order to achieve this different visual presentation.

The CSS that I've tried for the mobile (card) layout to this point is as follows:

table.data-list {
    display: grid;
    border-collapse: collapse;
    min-width: 100%;
    grid-template-columns: min-content min-content max-content 1fr;

    thead {
        display: none;
    }

    tbody,
    tr {
        display: contents;
    }

    row-gap: var(--grid-work-row-spacing);

    tr td {
        background-color: var(--cs-secondary-md);
        color: var(--cs-white-ish);
    }

    td {
        overflow: hidden;
        text-overflow: ellipsis;
        white-space: nowrap;
        padding: var(--grid-work-table-vertical-padding) var(--grid-work-table-horizontal-padding);
        font-size: var(--grid-work-row-label-height);
    }

    tr td:nth-child(1) {
        grid-column: 1/3;
    }

    tr td:nth-child(2) {
        grid-column: 1/3;
    }

    tr td:nth-child(3) {
        grid-column: 3/4;
    }

    tr td:nth-child(4) {
        grid-column: 4/5;
    }
}

Note in particular that I was hoping to pull the first and second table data items into a shared cell (spanning two columns) using the grid-column: 1/3; for each of tr td:nth-child(1) and tr td:nth-child(2). This did not work, instead what it did was flow the 2nd, 3rd and 4th data items to a new grid row, like so:

not what I was hoping for

Question: Is it possible using CSS to pull two td elements into a single CSS grid cell (and if so, how)?

Runable example: https://codepen.io/joelbrown/pen/LYZxXEx

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  • @Dharman - I have reverted your edit. The answer to my question was provided by G-Cyrillus and I have accepted his answer appropriately. What I've added to the question was some very particular details around how I implemented the correct advice that G-Cyrillus provided and added what might be useful additional detail that does not rise to the level of being an answer to my question. – Joel Brown Oct 25 '20 at 13:04
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    If you have any additional details, leave a comment. The question is for the question, not for answers or comments about answers. If the comment is sufficiently different from the answer, post a new answer instead of leaving a comment. – Zoe Oct 25 '20 at 13:24
  • Runable solution: codepen.io/joelbrown/pen/OJXWdaz - With thanks to @G-Cyrillus for identifying the solution. – Joel Brown Oct 25 '20 at 13:33
  • To summarize the key points: (a) Add grid-auto-flow: row dense; to the main grid element (i.e. table) (b) For all the <td> elements that follow the one being "merged" (in my case: tr td:nth-child(2) ~ td add both a row span: grid-row: span 2; and an alignment: align-self: stretch; - if you want the background to be distinct from the rest of the page. (c) Again for the case where the background of the "card" is a distinct colour, add spacing between cards for the td being merged and all subsequent ones (my case: tr td:nth-child(n+2)) like so: margin-bottom: 0.5rem;. – Joel Brown Oct 25 '20 at 13:33
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Question: Is it possible using CSS to pull two td elements into a single CSS grid cell (and if so, how)?

You can partially break the table-layout turning first two tds into a block.

(grid and contents display do not seem to be necessary here )

table {
  border-spacing: 0 0.2em;
  margin: 1em;
}

thead tr {
  background: #03337f;
  color: white;
}

tbody tr:nth-child(even) {
  background: gray;
}

td {
  padding: 0.25em;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 800px) {

  table {
    color: white;
  }
  table tr:nth-child(1n) {
    background: #000099;
  }
  /* break the table-layout from here */
  table tbody tr :nth-child(1),
  table tbody tr :nth-child(2) {
    display: block;
  }
  table tr :nth-child(2) {
    font-size: 0.65em;
  }
  /* not sure what you want about the thead td */
  table thead tr :nth-child(1),
  table thead tr :nth-child(2) {
    float: left;/* kills table-layout too */
    /*or  opacity:0; maybe ? */
    font-size: 0.01em;
  }
  table thead tr :nth-child(2) {
    font-size: 1rem;
  }
}
<table class="data-list">
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Day</th>
      <th>Date</th>
      <th>Time</th>
      <th>Event</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Friday</td>
      <td>October 23</td>
      <td>8:00pm</td>
      <td>Event A</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Saturday</td>
      <td>October 24</td>
      <td>10:00am</td>
      <td>Event B</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

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  • G-Cyrillus - Thanks for the answer. I can see that the code snippet works as a stand-alone. In my code, when I just change the display of tr :nth-child(1) and tr :nth-child(2) to block (and remove the gap-column assignment) each td element finds its way into it's usual grid column. If I leave the gap-column assignment in then the first td goes in the first column and the second td goes in the first column on the next grid row. The display: block doesn't actually seem to have any impact once the table is set to display: grid and the table has grid-template-columns provided. – Joel Brown Oct 24 '20 at 19:53
  • @JoelBrown my code actually doesn't mind at all a initial grid display, it goes from a table to a broken display:table. To my point of view, going through display:grid is not necessaryfrom that bits of code you shared, i have update the code snippet with a mediaquerie to clarify my answer on that point ;) – G-Cyrillus Oct 24 '20 at 20:40
  • if you still want to use grid, make the other cells span 2 rows, while the one supposed to stack don't ;) test : codepen.io/gc-nomade/pen/eYzgxEx – G-Cyrillus Oct 24 '20 at 21:04
  • Spanning rows and using row dense grid-auto-flow turned out to be the key to solving this. Thanks very much for all the help with this! – Joel Brown Oct 24 '20 at 22:24
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As soon as you apply display: grid; to a table tag, the table looses its display: table properties and the whole layout won't act as a table anymore, but as a grid. So you have to decide: Treat it as a table or treat it as a grid - and adjust the rest of the CSS according to that decision.

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