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I have several classes, inherited from a base one. I want to add some functionality, a timer to be exact, and functions to handle it, to all child classes, except one. Cause of that I can't just add this code to parent class. What is the best way to handle this task, avoiding code copying? Thanks!

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You can use a mixin, create a class with a timer and other classes that want to use it inherit from it. This class should not inherit form anything if possible.

Edit to add an example:

you create a class without inherit from QObject:

class TimerMixIn {}

Make any class that needs to use TimerMixIn inherit from it:

class A : public QObject, public TimerMixIn {}
class B : public QWidget, public TimerMixIn {}
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  • How is this the accepted answer. It is unclear and incomplete, to say the least. – scopchanov Oct 24 '20 at 22:44
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    @scopchanov It's about as clear and complete as the question, I would say :) – cigien Oct 24 '20 at 23:04
  • @cigien, that's true. However a bit more effort would be welcome. – scopchanov Oct 24 '20 at 23:07
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    @scopchanov Agreed. Hard to see how to answer this better with the info in the question. Probably best not to have answered it in the first place :) – cigien Oct 24 '20 at 23:09
  • @cigien, indeed. – scopchanov Oct 24 '20 at 23:10
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The fact that you have this issue indicates a problem with your inheritance structure.

You could create a BaseWithTimer class which all but 1 of your classes inherit from. I.e.:

Base
  `- BaseWithTimer
   |    `- A
   |     - B
   `- C
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If you are sure that these classes are best represented in the form of a hierarchy, then you can do one of the following:

Embed QTimer into the base class:

class BaseWithTimer : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT

protected:
    QTimer m_timer;
};

Do nothing more than just inherit from QObject:

class AnyClassWhereTimerNeeded : public QObject // no need more than just QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    AnyClassWhereTimerNeeded()
    {
        // To stop the timer you have to save the id it returns
        startTimer(1000);        

        // But you can start many timers without creation any new objects
        startTimer(50);
        startTimer(1000);
        startTimer(60000);
    }

protected:
    void timerEvent(QTimerEvent* event) override 
    {
        // do what you need
    }
};

As you see, the first approach is based on signals and slots, when the second is event based. As for me, embedding QTimer is more handy.

From the docs:

The QTimer class provides a high-level programming interface with single-shot timers and timer signals instead of events. There is also a QBasicTimer class that is more lightweight than QTimer and less clumsy than using timer IDs directly.

Also do not forget to read https://doc.qt.io/qt-5/timers.html

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