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I want to write a function that determines if all the letters of an inputted word are contained in another string of acceptable letters.

bool ContainsOnly(std::string inputtedWord, std::string acceptableLetters)
{
    // ... how do I write this?
}

Here's my testing framework:

bool Tester(std::string inputtedWord, std::string acceptableLetters)
{
    if (ContainsOnly(inputtedWord, acceptableLetters)) {
        std::cout << "Good!" << std::endl;
        return true;
    }
    else {
        std::cout << "No good!" << std::endl;
        return false;
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::string acceptableLetters;
    std::string inputtedWord;

    std::cout << "Please input the acceptable letters in your words: " << std::endl;
    std::cin >> acceptableLetters;

    while (inputtedWord != "STOP") 
    {
        std::cout << "Please input the word you would like to test: (type STOP to end testing): " << std::endl;
        std::cin >> inputtedWord;
        Tester(inputtedWord, acceptableLetters);
    }
    return 0;
}

I want the following output:

Please input the acceptable letters in your words: CODING

Please input the word you would like to test: (type STOP to end testing): COIN

Good!

Please input the word you would like to test: (type STOP to end testing): COP

No good!

1
  • 2
    Here's a simple way to figure out how to do this, and it never fails to work. Just take out a blank sheet of paper. Write down using short, simple sentences in plain English, a step-by-step process of doing this. When done, call your rubber duck for an appointment. We don't write code for other people, on Stackoverflow. We always refer such questions to your rubber duck. After your rubber duck approves your proposed plan of action, simply take what you've written down and translate it directly into C++. Mission accomplished! – Sam Varshavchik Oct 25 '20 at 1:30
1

You can use find_first_not_of like this:

bool ContainsOnly(std::string inputtedWord, std::string acceptableLetters)
{
    return inputtedWord.find_first_not_of(acceptableLetters) == std::string::npos;
}

Here's a demo.

0
  1. Put all the acceptable characters to std::set.
  2. Judge if all characters in the strings are in the set via std::all_of.
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>

bool ContainsOnly(std::string inputtedWord, std::string acceptableLetters)
{
     std::set<char> okSet(acceptableLetters.begin(), acceptableLetters.end());
     return std::all_of(inputtedWord.begin(), inputtedWord.end(),
                        [&okSet](char c) 
                        { 
                          return okSet.find(c) != okSet.end(); 
                        });
}
1
  • I edited the question to put the logic in a function instead of an if statement, so I updated your answer as well. Hope that's ok. – cigien Oct 26 '20 at 4:02

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