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I am learning how to use python, and yesterday I got a question which is described like this:

Modify the first_and_last function so that it returns True if the first letter of the string is the same as the last letter of the string, False if they’re different.

By trying to solve this, I found that there are 2 almost same program, but one can run correctly, the other calls an error: string index out of range

Program 1 (This can run correctly)

def first_and_last(message):
    if len(message) == 0 or message[0] == message[-1]:
        return True
    else:
        return False

print(first_and_last("else"))
print(first_and_last("tree"))
print(first_and_last(""))

Program 2(This calls an error)

def first_and_last(message):
    if message[0] == message[-1] or len(message) == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False

print(first_and_last("else"))
print(first_and_last("tree"))
print(first_and_last(""))

I just want to know what's the difference between these 2 programs, and why they return the different results. Appreciate it for your help!

2
  • 1
    If the length of the string is 0, then getting the value of message[0], i.e. the first letter of the string, gives an an exception that the index is out of bounds. There is no such character in the string. You first code is correct: check to make sure the character exits before looking at its value. Your code could be simplified to just return len(message) == 0 or message[0] == message[-1]. You don't need the if statement. Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 2:05
  • The specified functionality assumes that there are first and last letters in the string. Either an empty string is a precondition violation, or the spec needs to be fixed. Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 2:16

5 Answers 5

2

Because the or operator works by checking the first condition, and if the first condition is not true, then checking the second.

The left side of your or is true (the len(message) == 0), so the right is not executed (message[0] == message[-1]). Therefore you do not get a range exception.

If you swap the order, message[0] == message[-1] is on the left side of the operator and therefore is executed without checking if the string is empty.

You will see in this example

def condition_1():
    print('condition_1 executed')
    return True
def condition_2():
    print('condition_2 executed')
    return True

if condition_1()or condition_2():
    print('one condition is true')

you will get condition_1 executed. If you change condition_1 to return false, you will get both condition_1 executed and condition_2 executed.

0
0

Its because of "IndexError: string index out of range" error in your second program. First program compares len(message) first and has a "True" already. While your second program first compares the first char with the last one. So the issue.

0
0

The reason the first program works is because it firsts check if the len of the message is 0 and if it is True it immediately goes into the if statement while the second one first checks if the first letter is equal to the last letter and since the empty string doesn't have an index 0 if fails.

0
0

"or" statement is True if at least one of the conditions is true. When left side of "or" is true, right side is not executed so you got an error in second program for empty string but no error for empty string on first program

0
0

Recently when I go through the cs61a, I find some very useful information on the course website, and I decide to cover the essential part and put the link here for other people who may come up with this problem as a reference.

This problem is basically caused by the order that Python deal with the expression, namely, Short Circuiting. For example, when you type the following in Python:

1 / 0 or True

We will get a ZeroDivisionError, because divide 1 by 0 is invalid in Math. Sounds reasonable, right? But what do we get when running this code?

True or 1 / 0

Since it just exchanges the order of True and 1 / 0, maybe we will get the same result? The answer is no, after running the code, we get True instead, and here is how Short-circuiting works!

Short-circuiting happens when the operator reaches an operand that allows them to make a conclusion about the expression. In this case, or will short-circuit as soon as it reaches the first true value because it then knows that at least one value is true without executing 1 / 0(Despite it's invalid). Similarly, and will short-circuit when the first value is false because it knows that not all the value are true.

Here is the cheat sheet:

Operator Checks Evaluates from left to right up to
and if all the value are true the first false value
or if at least one value is true the first true value

Also here is the website: cs61a/fa20/lab/lab01/short-circuiting

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