4

I've used HtmlAgilityPack in the past to parse HTML in .Net but I don't like the fact that it only uses a DOM model.

On large documents and/or those with heavy levels of nesting it is possible to hit stack overflow or out of memory exceptions. Also in general a DOM based parsing model uses significantly more memory than a streaming based approach, typically because the process that wants to consume the HTML may only need a few elements to be available at a time.

Does anyone know of a decent HTML parser for .Net that allows you to parse HTML in a manner similar to the XmlReader class? i.e. in a forward only streaming manner

  • Beyond the fact your question is legitimate, do you have a real example of such an Html page that causes a stack overflow or out of memory exception with Html Agility Pack? I'd be curious to see what it looks like. – Simon Mourier Jun 23 '11 at 13:04
  • Shall try and dig an example up for you tomorrow. But would you consider adding a XmlReader style class to the library in the future? – RobV Jun 23 '11 at 19:22
  • Don't waste too much time, I was just curious :-) I do have an HtmlReader in stock, but it's not public. – Simon Mourier Jun 23 '11 at 19:24
  • @Simon Will this be in a future release of the library? My API has to extract data from a variety of other formats and currently HTML is the only format where I am still stuck using DOM based parsing because HtmlAgilityPack doesn't support streaming parsing atm – RobV Jun 24 '11 at 14:36
5

I usually use SgmlReader for this: https://github.com/MindTouch/SGMLReader

Like others have said, there are issues in that HTML doesn't follow the same well-formed rules of XML, so it is inherently difficult to parse, but SgmlReader usually does a pretty good job.

1

The problem is that HTML can be malformed. And you can't know which tag is missing an end tag (or which tags are placed in the incorrect order) until you have parsed a larger part of the document.

If the documents that you'll parsed is well formed, why don't you use the XmlReader?

  • 1
    Precisely for the reason that they almost certainly will be malformed :-( – RobV Jun 23 '11 at 10:31

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.