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I created structer of 10 by 10 array for storing random number. Also made a list so each member will hold different 10 by 10. But when i print it, the numbers kind of broken, i dont know if my for loops are incorrect or there is something else. I hope i am doing the list thing correct.

struct Num
{
    int Numbers[10][10];

};

struct Hold
{
    struct Num *List;
}FullList;


int main(void)
{
    time_t t;
    int x;
    srand((unsigned) time(&t));
    printf("Enter the number of arrays you want to create: ");
    scanf("%d", &x);

    FullList.List = malloc(x * sizeof(int));
    if (FullList.List == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Malloc failed.\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    int i, j, k;


    for(i=0;i<x;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<10;j++)
        {
            for(k=0;k<10;k++)
            {
                FullList.List[i].Numbers[j][k] = rand() % 255;

            }


        }
    }

    for(i=0;i<x;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<10;j++)
        {
            for(k=0;k<10;k++)
            {

                printf("%d  %d  %d  %d %d  %d  %d  %d  %d  %d \n", FullList.List[i].Numbers[j][k]);

            }


        }
    }

    return 0;
}
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  • ImageList.List = malloc(x * sizeof(int)); is wrong. It should be ImageList.List = malloc(x * sizeof(struct Num)); The amount you're allocating is way too small. Also, you should check the value returned by malloc to make sure it isn't NULL. – Tom Karzes Oct 26 '20 at 15:37
  • @TomKarzes what do you mean by too small, how should i allocate then. Thanks for the answer btw – Carl Oct 26 '20 at 15:42
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  • @Carl It looks like someone gave you an answer, but the point is you were allocating space for x integers, but you needed space for x instances of struct Num. Each struct Num contains an array of 100 integers total. So the allocated size was 100 times too small at the very least. This is something you really need to understand. – Tom Karzes Oct 26 '20 at 18:01
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I'm going to assume ImageList is a typo and you meant FullList, which is what I'll use in my examples. If that's the case, then you're not allocating memory correctly:

FullList.List = malloc(x * sizeof(int));

You're allocating enough space for x int objects, not x objects of type struct Num. You're not allocating anywhere near enough space for your intended use. A better way to do this would be

FullList.List = malloc( x * sizeof *FullList.List )

The expression sizeof *FullList.List is equivalent to sizeof (struct Num); this will allocate enough space for x struct Num objects, which is what you want. In general, you should write your malloc calls as

T *p = malloc( sizeof *p * N ); // for any non-function type T

or

T *p = NULL;
...
p = malloc( sizeof *p * N );

Always check the result of malloc, calloc, and realloc calls.

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  • thanks man helped a lot but the printed numbers are still wrong, this is the first line of the matris "28 0 9 6422048 0 6422048 4200281 1 34 -1230284480" no idea where those numbers came from. – Carl Oct 26 '20 at 15:49
  • 1
    The printf statement has lots of format specifiers (%d) but only provides one parameter to print (FullList.List[i].Numbers[j][k]). The rest of the %d are getting undefined behavior, so just printing random values on the stack. You want your print to have just one %d based on how you wrote the loops. – Outrageous Bacon Oct 26 '20 at 15:55
  • @OutrageousBacon ohh how did i missed that thanks man. – Carl Oct 26 '20 at 15:59

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