I have attempted to create a derived class of Timer that allows for a 'Pause' latch to be set to keep the worker thread from reactivating the timer. However, Elapsed events are continued to be raised when AutoReset is set to false and the Enabled accessor appears to be doing it's job in preventing the Enabled property of the base class from being modified once the Paused variable is set.

Why is this happening or what strategies should I use to further understand what interactions are actually happening here?

I have attached the implementation of the derived class below.

    using System.Timers
    class PauseableTimer : Timer
    {
      public bool Paused;
      new public bool Enabled
      { 
        get
        {
          return base.Enabled;
        } 
        set
        {
          if (Paused)
          {
            if (!value) base.Enabled = false;
          } 
          else
          {
            base.Enabled = value;
          }
        }
      }
    }

Example illustrating problem.

class Program
{
    private static PauseableTimer _pauseableTimer;
    private static int _elapsedCount;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        _pauseableTimer = new PauseableTimer(){AutoReset = false,Enabled = false,Paused = false};

        _pauseableTimer.Elapsed += pauseableTimer_Elapsed;
        _pauseableTimer.Interval = 1;
        _pauseableTimer.Enabled = true;
        while(_elapsedCount<100)
        {
            if (_elapsedCount > 50) _pauseableTimer.Paused = true;
        }
    }

    static void pauseableTimer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("this.Enabled:'{0}',Paused:'{1}',AutoReset:'{2}",_pauseableTimer.Enabled,_pauseableTimer.Paused,_pauseableTimer.AutoReset));
        _elapsedCount++;
        _pauseableTimer.Interval = _pauseableTimer.Interval == 1 ? 2 : 1; //This line breaks it.
        _pauseableTimer.Enabled = true;
    }
}
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Relevant document, System.Timers.Timer.Interval

Note If Enabled and AutoReset are both set to false, and the timer has previously been enabled, setting the Interval property causes the Elapsed event to be raised once, as if the Enabled property had been set to true. To set the interval without raising the event, you can temporarily set the AutoReset property to true.

The recommended solution of setting AutoReset to true does not solve the problem because there is an undocumented behavior of setting AutoReset to true during an event handler also allowing for an event to be fired.

The solution seems to be to build out the derived object to the point where you can keep any of the apparently many ways that an event can be fired again from happening.

Below is the implementation that I ended with.

public class PauseableTimer : Timer
{
    private bool _paused;
    public bool Paused
    {
        get { return _paused; }
        set 
        { 
            Interval = _interval;
            _paused = value;
        }
    }

    new public bool Enabled
    {
        get
        {
            return base.Enabled;
        }
        set
        {
            if (Paused)
            {
                if (!value) base.Enabled = false;
            }
            else
            {
                base.Enabled = value;
            }
        }
    }

    private double _interval;
    new public double Interval
    {
        get { return base.Interval; }
        set
        {
            _interval = value;
            if (Paused){return;}
            if (value>0){base.Interval = _interval;}
        }
    }

    public PauseableTimer():base(1){}

    public PauseableTimer(double interval):base(interval){}
}
  • Exactly the problem I was seeing. Bottom Line: don't set the interval or the timer will fire. – goku_da_master Nov 1 '12 at 14:42

Everything is more complex in multithreading, I'm afraid. Assuming your code is working as you wish, there is a window where in-flight events can get raised after you reset the Enabled property. See this quote from the MSDN docs.

The signal to raise the Elapsed event is always queued for execution on a ThreadPool thread. This might result in the Elapsed event being raised after the Enabled property is set to false. The code example for the Stop method shows one way to work around this race condition.

  • I'm not getting one event firing after I am attempting to pause it. I am getting many events firing. One event getting fired is acceptable, I just don't want it to continue firing for all eternity. – Erick Jun 23 '11 at 14:32
  • In that case, your logic for resetting Enabled must be incorrect, I would think. Can you alter your OnElapsed event to check it before executing the logic? In the code above I cannot see how Paused will ever be true, for example. – Steve Townsend Jun 23 '11 at 14:34
  • Paused is a public variable and is modified by the client object. I have run the code under a debugger and verified that the accessor does not allow for Enabled to be set to true once Paused is set to true. I do not know a technique to get the debugger to stop at the moment before the Elapsed event is fired. – Erick Jun 23 '11 at 14:43
  • All I'm saying is verify that Enabled is in the right state in the Elapsed event callback. Make sure you are checking the Timer.Enabled field and not PausableTimer.Elapsed. – Steve Townsend Jun 23 '11 at 14:51
  • I did. I broke on the event handler for Enabled and set a watch on the instance of PausableTimer. Then I opened up the base class information and single stepped through the execution of the thread. The accessor was hit and at no point during the thread the PauseableTimer.Enabled or PauseableTimer.Timer.Enabled change. I will create executable sample code shortly to illustrate what is happening. – Erick Jun 23 '11 at 14:56

Another option is to suppress the event??? I can't explain what is going but the theory presented below should allow you to circumvent this little problem you have discussed. As Steve mentioned put a 'Watch and break point on the enabled property' that you are try set and make sure it is actually being set.

How would I tackle this:

Catch and check for the 'Enabled' property and remove '-=' the subscribing method (handler) as of when needed and then re-add '+=' it again when you do need handle the 'Elapsed' event.

I have used this style quite a few times on a few different WinForms project. If you don't want the 'Elapsed' event to be handled programmatically create a check for and remove it when a certain condition is met and then add it when the opposite condition is met.

if (paused) // determine pause logic to be true in here
{
   timer.Elapsed -= ... // remove the handling method.
}
else
{
   timer.Elapsed += ... // re-add it in again
}

The above code logic will allow you code to ignore the 'Elapsed' event ever time it is raised whilst the 'Paused' flag is true. I hope the above helps

  • This seems like a reasonable way to do it. I have some concerns about being able to maintain an accurate list of event handlers, but those seems like solvable problems. I still want to understand why I'm getting the behavior that I'm seeing. If a solution to why I'm seeing what I'm currently seeing can't be found I'll likely use your solution. Thank you. – Erick Jun 23 '11 at 14:51

I would reformat your code:

// from this
if (!value) base.Enabled = false;

// to this
if (!value) 
    base.Enabled = false;

Not only does it read better, you can put a break point on the key line and see if it's being executed

  • 2
    Break points in C# (or at least in Visual Studio) are not necessarily bound to a line. You can set breakpoints on statements, regardless of formatting. – Joey Jun 23 '11 at 14:19
  • You can set a breakpoint but you do not know if it stops because of the if or the assignment. Putting two logical steps on one line of code is a bad practice. – Steve Wellens Jun 23 '11 at 16:42
  • Curly braces? For better code readability? – mike james Feb 9 '14 at 20:48

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