39

I'm wondering how to do something only if Integer.parseInt(whatever) doesn't fail.

More specifically I have a jTextArea of user specified values seperated by line breaks.

I want to check each line to see if can be converted to an int.

Figured something like this, but it doesn't work:

for(int i = 0; i < worlds.jTextArea1.getLineCount(); i++){
                    if(Integer.parseInt(worlds.jTextArea1.getText(worlds.jTextArea1.getLineStartOffset(i),worlds.jTextArea1.getLineEndOffset(i)) != (null))){}
 }

Any help appreciated.

2

8 Answers 8

62
public static boolean isParsable(String input) {
    try {
        Integer.parseInt(input);
        return true;
    } catch (final NumberFormatException e) {
        return false;
    }
}
5
  • 9
    Don't catch ALL exceptions. That's really bad practice. Jun 23, 2011 at 15:07
  • 14
    NumberFormatException. You may as well get it right. It's documented.
    – user207421
    Jun 23, 2011 at 23:01
  • 1
    this will ONLY work with this specific try/catch statement or any other NumberFormatException.
    – user4919188
    Sep 12, 2016 at 4:56
  • 1
    "Don't catch ALL exceptions. That's really bad practice." In this case, it is perfectly fine and also the right thing to do because what you are only doing is checking if anything went wrong. Catch all exceptions and log them. Jan 24, 2019 at 9:21
  • 1
    Catching ALL exceptions is never the right thing to do, as the only Exceptions which are expected here are the ones thrown by parseInt. If anything else were to go wrong you would not want the program to keep running (lets say an illegalaccessexception because someone messed with reflection) May 11, 2020 at 19:36
28

Check if it is integer parseable

public boolean isInteger(String string) {
    try {
        Integer.valueOf(string);
        return true;
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        return false;
    }
}

or use Scanner

Scanner scanner = new Scanner("Test string: 12.3 dog 12345 cat 1.2E-3");

while (scanner.hasNext()) {
    if (scanner.hasNextDouble()) {
        Double doubleValue = scanner.nextDouble();
    } else {
        String stringValue = scanner.next();
    }
}

or use Regular Expression like

private static Pattern doublePattern = Pattern.compile("-?\\d+(\\.\\d*)?");

public boolean isDouble(String string) {
    return doublePattern.matcher(string).matches();
}
1
  • 3
    +1 for verification without exceptions using Scanner. Mar 31, 2014 at 19:11
12

It would be something like this.

String text = textArea.getText();
Scanner reader = new Scanner(text).useDelimiter("\n");
while(reader.hasNext())
    String line = reader.next();

    try{
        Integer.parseInt(line);
        //it worked
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException e){
       //it failed
    }
}
10

parseInt will throw NumberFormatException if it cannot parse the integer. So doing this will answer your question

try{
Integer.parseInt(....)
}catch(NumberFormatException e){
//couldn't parse
}
1
  • 3
    This should be the correct answer, as the accepted one is wrong. Jun 25, 2018 at 14:35
8

You can use a scanner instead of try-catch:

Scanner scanner = new Scanner(line).useDelimiter("\n");
if(scanner.hasNextInt()){
    System.out.println("yes, it's an int");
}
3

You could try

NumberUtils.isParsable(yourInput)

It is part of org/apache/commons/lang3/math/NumberUtils and it checks whether the string can be parsed by Integer.parseInt(String), Long.parseLong(String), Float.parseFloat(String) or Double.parseDouble(String).

See below:

https://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/apidocs/org/apache/commons/lang3/math/NumberUtils.html#isParsable-java.lang.String-

2

You can use the try..catch statement in java, to capture an exception that may arise from Integer.parseInt().

Example:

try {
  int i = Integer.parseint(stringToParse);
  //parseInt succeded
} catch(Exception e)
{
   //parseInt failed
}
3
  • Why the downvote? This is a valid answer, and though the Exception catching is too vague for good practice it will work.
    – josh.trow
    Jun 23, 2011 at 15:12
  • 2
    @josh.trow, throwing an exception when doing a parseint is also bad practice as it really is not something truly exceptional, one could either provide a parsable method (to check if it can be parsed) or convert it to a weird value (like Ruby and perl) Jun 23, 2011 at 15:14
  • So what is the exception for?
    – user207421
    Jun 23, 2011 at 23:01
2

instead of trying & catching expressions.. its better to run regex on the string to ensure that it is a valid number..

4
  • Better how? Why reinvent the wheel? Why run the risk that the regex doesn't match what parseInt() does? Why waste the time and the money?
    – user207421
    Jun 23, 2011 at 23:03
  • 2
    when an exception there is an overhead (for the JVM) to prepare the stack trace & then continue with executing the program (this is a bit time consuming)... its always better to check the expression before parsing it.. Jun 24, 2011 at 0:17
  • 1
    The overhead is insignificant, and the other issues I raised are not. Your blanket statement is not supportable.
    – user207421
    Jun 24, 2011 at 1:25
  • 7 years later and no-one has picked up on this one - accusations of 'blanket statements' is not helpful. If performance is critical, then it would be necessary to run comparisons of the two techniques. Neither preparing regex nor stacktraces are completely negligible. And in fact the regex could be cached.
    – Adam
    Dec 14, 2018 at 10:51

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