0

I was experimenting to see if I could create an array of queues and I typed in the following:

void showq(queue <unsigned long long> gq)
{
    queue <unsigned long long> g = gq;
    while (!g.empty())
    {
        cout << '\t' << g.front();
        g.pop();
    }
    cout << '\n';
}

int main () 
{
    unsigned long long  lol = 589900;
    unsigned long long  lal = 585501;
    unsigned long long  lel = 584402;
    unsigned long long  lul = 583303;
    unsigned long long  lil = 582204;
    unsigned long long  l3l = 586605;
    unsigned long long val = 4;
    queue<unsigned long long> qt [val];
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[1].push(l3l);
    qt[2].push(l3l);
    qt[3].push(lal);
    qt[4].push(lal);
    

    return 0;
}

The compiler didn't complain so I thought this was correct, but once I started to access the "array" I got a segfault. What exactly is this doing though?

3
  • Please edit your question to provide some minimal reproducible example. The given code should not even compile (you forgot some #include in it) Oct 28, 2020 at 5:26
  • 3
    Count how many queues are you attempting to access, and how many queues there are in the array. Use your fingers.
    – eerorika
    Oct 28, 2020 at 5:31
  • Btw, val should be const or constexpr here
    – Ranoiaetep
    Oct 28, 2020 at 5:44

3 Answers 3

4

Obvious:

 qt[4].push(lal);

you are accessing a fifth element in the array. qt[3] is the maximum value you can reach. (0,1,2,3 are 4 values, like you specified)

2

I was experimenting to see if I could create an array of queues

Yes, you can do that. Read a good C++ programming book, then see this C++ reference website, and perhaps read n3337, the C++11 standard.

Read also the documentation of your C++ compiler (perhaps GCC) and debugger (perhaps GDB). Compile your code with all warnings and debug info, so (if using a recent GCC) with g++ -Wall -Wextra -g

To iterate on std::queues, better use some range for statement.

Also, prefer using std::array instead of raw arrays.

You could also use (in 2020) a recent Clang compiler and possibly the Clang static analyzer. With a recent GCC (i.e. GCC 10 in autumn 2020) you could also use its static analysis options.

Use your debugger to find your bug. Beware of buffer overflow or other undefined behavior.

See also the DECODER European project.

Notice that your code, as given in your question, does not even compile.

You forgot several #includes. On Linux/Debian with GCC 10 invoked as g++ -Wall -Wextra -g /tmp/vzdiegocm.cc -o /tmp/vzdiegocm -where /tmp/vzdiegocm.cc is exactly your code- I am getting:

/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:2:6: error: variable or field ‘showq’ declared void
    2 | void showq(queue <unsigned long long> gq)
      |      ^~~~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:2:12: error: queue’ was not declared in this scope
    2 | void showq(queue <unsigned long long> gq)
      |            ^~~~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:2:19: error: expected primary-expression before ‘unsigned’
    2 | void showq(queue <unsigned long long> gq)
      |                   ^~~~~~~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:22:5: error: queue’ was not declared in this scope
   22 |     queue<unsigned long long> qt [val];
      |     ^~~~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:22:11: error: expected primary-expression before ‘unsigned’
   22 |     queue<unsigned long long> qt [val];
      |           ^~~~~~~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:23:5: error: qt’ was not declared in this scope
   23 |     qt[0].push(lol);
      |     ^~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:17:25: warning: unused variable ‘lel’ [-Wunused-variable]
   17 |     unsigned long long  lel = 584402;
      |                         ^~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:18:25: warning: unused variable ‘lul’ [-Wunused-variable]
   18 |     unsigned long long  lul = 583303;
      |                         ^~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:19:25: warning: unused variable ‘lil’ [-Wunused-variable]
   19 |     unsigned long long  lil = 582204;
      |                         ^~~
/tmp/vzdiegocm.cc:21:24: warning: unused variable ‘val’ [-Wunused-variable]
   21 |     unsigned long long val = 4;
      |                        ^~~
4
  • What the GDB debugger will tell you. Probably some buffer overflow or other undefined behavior Oct 28, 2020 at 5:23
  • There are some good advices here, but the real problem op was having was explained by @raildex, where he was accessing beyond the end of the array
    – Ranoiaetep
    Oct 28, 2020 at 5:52
  • Yes, but a major problem is that the code given in the question does not even compile Oct 28, 2020 at 5:56
  • I guess OP did not copy pasted everything. there are no includes for example and I assume OP has using namespace std somewhere.
    – Raildex
    Oct 28, 2020 at 6:25
-1

I think it thinks u use an interpretation type language. This program may have some logical errors or you may have tried to access some null value. My first answer. Please be nice to me. And you have repeated

  qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);
    qt[0].push(lol);

This maybe one of the reasons

3
  • This isn't an actual answer, you're just guessing. Oct 28, 2020 at 5:43
  • There's nothing wrong with having multiple lines saying qt[0].push(lol). It's just accessing the first queue located in the array, then push(lol) to that queue.
    – Ranoiaetep
    Oct 28, 2020 at 5:46
  • Didnt have much reputation points to comment then. thats why did my good old first answering
    – Chattr Box
    Oct 28, 2020 at 15:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.