36
class A {
    private $aa;
    protected $bb = 'parent bb';

    function __construct($arg) {
       //do something..
    }

    private function parentmethod($arg2) {
       //do something..
    }
}

class B extends A {
    function __construct($arg) {
        parent::__construct($arg);
    }
    function childfunction() {
        echo parent::$bb; //Fatal error: Undefined class constant 'bb' 
    }
}

$test = new B($some);
$test->childfunction();

Question: How do I display parent variable in child? expected result will echo 'parent bb'

64
echo $this->bb;

The variable is inherited and is not private, so it is a part of the current object.


Here is additional information in response to your request for more information about using parent:::

Use parent:: when you want add extra functionality to a method from the parent class. For example, imagine an Airplane class:

class Airplane {
    private $pilot;

    public function __construct( $pilot ) {
        $this->pilot = $pilot;
    }
}

Now suppose we want to create a new type of Airplane that also has a navigator. You can extend the __construct() method to add the new functionality, but still make use of the functionality offered by the parent:

class Bomber extends Airplane {
    private $navigator;

    public function __construct( $pilot, $navigator ) {
        $this->navigator = $navigator;

        parent::__construct( $pilot ); // Assigns $pilot to $this->pilot
    }
}

In this way, you can follow the DRY principle of development but still provide all of the functionality you desire.

  • so thats mean parent keyword only used to access parent method? – Kuntau Jun 23 '11 at 15:57
  • 1
    Usually, you would use parent:: when you want to override a parent method, but still reference the parent's functionality. If you just want to call the parent's method, you do it the same way as for a variable: $this->parentmethod() – George Cummins Jun 23 '11 at 15:58
6

Just echo it since it's inherited

echo $this->bb;
  • Just make sure that variable is not defined as private. – MilanG Jun 29 '18 at 12:07
  • I cannot get this to work. The variable is public, but the variables just aren't getting inherited. – user2924019 Mar 26 at 13:48
  • Apparently it's not. I assumed it would be but found they don't get inherited. – user2924019 Mar 26 at 16:44
4
class A {
    private $aa;
    protected $bb = 'parent bb';

    function __construct($arg) {
       //do something..
    }

    private function parentmethod($arg2) {
       //do something..
    }
}

class B extends A {
    function __construct($arg) {
        parent::__construct($arg);
    }
    function childfunction() {
        echo parent::$this->bb; //works by M
    }
}

$test = new B($some);
$test->childfunction();`
  • 7
    parent::$this->bb has got to be the craziest object-oriented syntax I've ever seen – Tobia Sep 28 '16 at 15:03
  • 2
    parent:: in parent::$this->bb achieves nothing but confusing the person asking. I recommend removal or further explanation in order to reduce complexity of the answer. – SEoF Nov 24 '17 at 22:14
  • 2
    this doesn't work Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Access to undeclared static property: A::$this in /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/native_testing/index.php:24 Stack trace: #0 /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/native_testing/index.php(29): B->childfunction() #1 {main} thrown in /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/native_testing/index.php on line 24 – ichimaru Jun 19 '18 at 5:15
  • This code returns Fatal error: Access to undeclared static property: A::$this – user2924019 Mar 26 at 16:45
3

With parent::$bb; you try to retrieve the static constant defined with the value of $bb.

Instead, do:

echo $this->bb;

Note: you don't need to call parent::_construct if B is the only class that calls it. Simply don't declare __construct in B class.

2

$bb has now become the private member of class B after extending class A where it was protected.

So you access $bb like it's an attribute of class B.

class A {
    private $aa;
    protected $bb = 'parent bb';

    function __construct($arg) {
       //do something..
    }

    private function parentmethod($arg2) {
       //do something..
    }
}

class B extends A {
    function __construct($arg) {
        parent::__construct($arg);
    }
    function childfunction() {
        echo $this->bb; 
    }
}

$test = new B($some);
$test->childfunction();
1

all the properties and methods of the parent class is inherited in the child class so theoretically you can access them in the child class but beware using the protected keyword in your class because it throws a fatal error when used in the child class.
as mentioned in php.net

The visibility of a property or method can be defined by prefixing the declaration with the keywords public, protected or private. Class members declared public can be accessed everywhere. Members declared protected can be accessed only within the class itself and by inherited and parent classes. Members declared as private may only be accessed by the class that defines the member.

  • 1
    protected doesn't throw errors when used in inherited and parent classes. – T30 Oct 24 '17 at 9:07

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