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Is it at all possible to make an IP Address point to a specific name? I don't mind what method needs to be done, just need some suggestions as I'm new to bash. The reason for this is I want to make a script that checks which Site the IP I input is for.

e.g 10.10.100.10 = SITECODE

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    You can set static ip to host entries in /etc/hosts. Though it's not entirely clear that's really what you are after.
    – kaylum
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 22:49
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    But.. bash is not responsible for translating ip to a name, it's unrelated.
    – KamilCuk
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 23:38

1 Answer 1

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so here is a working code, $1 is for the first argument after the script name in the console command.

P.S. I have bash 4.4.20 version

you can run it like this:

./script.sh 127.0.0.1

the output should be:

Alice

#!/bin/bash
INPUT=$1
ARRAY=( "127.0.0.1:Alice"
        "127.0.0.2:Bob"
        "127.0.0.3:John"
         )

for pair in "${ARRAY[@]}" ; do
KEY="${pair%%:*}"
if [ "$KEY" = "$INPUT" ];then
    VALUE="${pair##*:}"
    echo $VALUE    
fi
done

another variant is to read from file list_of_ip.txt (the file should not have additional newline):

#!/bin/bash
INPUT=$1

while IFS= read -r pair; do
    KEY="${pair%%:*}"
    if [ "$KEY" = "$INPUT" ];then
        VALUE="${pair##*:}"
        echo $VALUE
    fi
done < list_of_ip.txt
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  • 1
    Why would you use a numerically-indexed array rather than an associative one (where the keys used to index into it are themselves strings)? If you have declare -A array=( ["127.0.0.1"]="Alice" ["127.0.0.2"]="Bob" ), you can just look up ${array[127.0.0.1]} in constant time to get Alice as a result. Commented Oct 29, 2020 at 0:37
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    And [ $KEY == $INPUT ] is several flavors of wrong -- it'll behave badly if your IFS value contains characters found in either of your variables, or if that variable is empty. Quote your strings, and for best portability use = (the POSIX-specified test operator for string comparison) instead of == (a bash extension). Thus: [ "$KEY" = "$INPUT" ] Commented Oct 29, 2020 at 0:38
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    ...and also consider using lower-case names for all your variables, not just pair. POSIX specifies that all-uppercase variables are allowed to modify behavior of your shell or other operating-system-provided tools, whereas variables with at least one lower-case letter in their names are guaranteed not to modify behavior of the shell or POSIX-specified OS-provided tools (see pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/…, keeping in mind that environment variables and regular shell variables share a single namespace). Commented Oct 29, 2020 at 0:40
  • I think you contradict yourself a little bit, on another system there may be another version of Bash that does not support Hash tables. Commented Oct 29, 2020 at 0:51
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    I recommend against using nonportable constructs when they add no value. == adds no benefit whatsoever; you're writing longer code than you would with =, and also getting code that doesn't work on baseline POSIX test. Hash tables / associative arrays do add a benefit (in both terseness and performance), so you get something in return for paying the cost of nonportable code. Commented Oct 29, 2020 at 0:52

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