9

Each time I build a JS library I have this sort of concept:

(function(window,undefined){
  var LibName = function(){
    var privateAPI = {
      method: function(){}
    };
    var publicAPI = {
      publicMethod: function(){}
    };
    return publicAPI;
  }
  window.LibName = LibName;
})();

But i've always longed for just doing:

(function(window,undefined){
  var LibName = function(){
    var private = {
      method: function(){}
    };
    var public = {
      publicMethod: function(){}
    };
    return public;
  }
  window.LibName = LibName;
})();

But I've never done that because those are reserved words. Just how reserved are they? Will a browser fail? In my testing, everything seems to work, but am I missing something?

2
  • 2
    You're missing the notion that overloading language reserved words is a bad idea. ;> Not because it will confuse the browser, but because it will confuse the humans who try to read or debug your code.
    – dthorpe
    Commented Jun 23, 2011 at 18:35
  • And that in the future, it may cause problems, such as when JS (EcmaScript) decides to support private variables. Commented Feb 16, 2012 at 19:26

4 Answers 4

15

Always assume that using reserved words improperly will cause the application to fail.

Words like public and private are future reserved words, so even if they work now the might not in the future.

1
  • Actually, in ES6 they will work just fine as property names.
    – user9315861
    Commented Jul 30, 2018 at 6:26
9

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Reserved_Words

and

http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/ECMA-262.pdf for the official specification.

They're listed in 7.6.1.2 as "reserved for future use".

2

I would not recommend to use private and public. But you'll get an error only by using strict mode with "use strict": https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Strict_mode

If you want to be sure, it will work in the future, you would have to use parentheses:

this["private"] = {
  method: function() {}
}

I prefer to shorten the var to "pub" and "priv". So I use a pattern like this:

namespace.decorator = function (pub, priv) {
  pub = pub || {};
  priv = priv || {};
  //namespace.decoratorToExtend(pub, priv);
  pub.method = function() {alert(pub.prop)};
  return pub;
}
var instance = namespace.decorator({prop:'hello world'});
instance.method();
-1

From what I've experienced with reserved words in javascript the code will error out with something like a syntax error.

1
  • -1. It's not necessarily true. You can use keywords like public and private if not in the strict mode, although this is discouraged. Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 5:03

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