-3

This is the code :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "   SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS" >> endl;
    cout << " SS:::::::::::::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S:::::SSSSSS::::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S:::::S     SSSSSSS" >> endl;
    cout << "S:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S::::SSSS" >> endl;
    cout << "  SS::::::SSSSS" >> endl;
    cout << "    SSS::::::::SS" >> endl;
    cout << "       SSSSSS::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "            S:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "            S:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "SSSSSSS     S:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S::::::SSSSSS:::::S" >> endl;
    cout << "S:::::::::::::::SS" >> endl;
    cout << " SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS" >> endl;
    cout << "IIIIIIIIII" >> endl;
    cout << "I::::::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "I::::::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "II::::::II" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "  I::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "II::::::II" >> endl;
    cout << "I::::::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "I::::::::I" >> endl;
    cout << "IIIIIIIIII" >>
}

This is for school so don't ask why I am writing this code. But i get a lot of errors like the one in the title and I can't seem to find the problem so if anyone can help me, it'll be great!

1
  • 3
    The insertion operator is <<, not >>. Also, you could have reduced the example down to a single line of code to demonstrate the error. – cigien Oct 29 '20 at 19:35
1

When writing using the extraction or insertion operator (e.g >> or << respectively) you need to basically point it where you want the flow to go, and not change the flow for that whole statement, to put it in simple terms, in your case you want both insertion/extraction operators that you use to be facing like so << and that one is called an insertion operator.

This is the code you want:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "   SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS" << endl;
}

and replicate that for as many times as you want there to be output statements.

0
0

Keep the flow going one direction and one direction only:

std::cout << "..." << std::endl;

You've got this going in and out at the same time.

You can't read from std::cout, it's for output only. It's an ostream which means it has no idea what >> even is. That operator isn't defined which is why you get that error.

10
  • Is it really necessary to answer this question, instead of commenting and voting to close as a typo? – cigien Oct 29 '20 at 19:39
  • 1
    @cigien It's not just a typo. It's an explanation of why that matters. – tadman Oct 29 '20 at 19:39
  • I'm not convinced that the error needs much of an explanation, but it's fine I guess. – cigien Oct 29 '20 at 19:41
  • 1
    @cigien Better than answering in the comments section. – Asteroids With Wings Oct 29 '20 at 20:05
  • 1
    Yes, I do see your point, and there are certainly many cases where an answer would be appropriate. There's nothing wrong with the answer, of course, but I just felt that in this case, it could have fit in a comment. – cigien Oct 29 '20 at 20:12

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.