3

Our internal program is written in C makes extensive use of snprintf() for many piece, and I noticed that during debugging with perf record/report, it's spending a lot of time on the following:

       │      _IO_vfprintf_internal():                                                                                                                                                                                             ▒
       │        mov    -0x510(%rbp),%rdx                                                                                                                                                                                           ▒
       │        mov    %r12,%rsi                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
       │        mov    %r15,%rdi                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
       │      → callq  *0x38(%rax)                                                                                                                                                                                                 ▒
       │        cmp    %rax,-0x510(%rbp)                                                                                                                                                                                           ▒
       │        mov    -0x530(%rbp),%r9                                                                                                                                                                                            ▒
       │      ↑ jne    91a                                                                                                                                                                                                         ▒
       │        mov    -0x4d0(%rbp),%esi                                                                                                                                                                                           ▒
       │        mov    -0x540(%rbp),%ecx                                                                                                                                                                                           ▒
       │        mov    $0x7fffffff,%eax                                                                                                                                                                                            ▒
       │        sub    %esi,%eax                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
       │        add    %esi,%ecx                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
       │        cltq                                                                                                                                                                                                               ▒
       │        cmp    %rax,-0x510(%rbp)                                                                                                                                                                                           ▒
       │      ↑ jbe    252b                                                                                                                                                                                                        ▒
       │      ↑ jmpq   28f0                                                                                                                                                                                                        ▒
       │4a70:   xor    %eax,%eax                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
       │        or     $0xffffffffffffffff,%rcx                                                                                                                                                                                    ▒
       │        mov    %r12,%rdi                                                                                                                                                                                                   ▒
 99.52 │        repnz  scas %es:(%rdi),%al

It seems regardless of the GCC version/glibc, I've tried GCC 4.8.5 all the way to GCC 9, O2 to O3, etc. I've even used a sandbox with glibc from -HEAD.

Edit: I found a test program that demonstrates this problem quite well with perf:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

char dst[20000];

static void test_strcpy(int i) {
    size_t len = sizeof(dst);
    char* src = (char*)malloc(len + 1);
    memset(src, 'a', len);
    src[len] = 0;

    while (i--)
        strcpy(dst, src);

    free(src);
}

static void test_strncat(int i) {
    size_t len = sizeof(dst);
    char* src = (char*)malloc(len + 1);
    memset(src, 'a', len);
    src[len] = 0;

    while (i--) {
    dst[0] = 0;
        strncat(dst, src, sizeof(dst));
    }

    free(src);
}

#define BENCH(FN, ARG)                          \
do {                                    \
    struct timeval start, end;                      \
    long sec, msec;                         \
    gettimeofday(&start, NULL);                     \
    FN(ARG);                                \
    gettimeofday(&end, NULL);                       \
    sec = end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec;                    \
    msec = end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec;                 \
    if (msec < 0) {                         \
    --sec;                              \
    msec += 1000000;                        \
    }                                   \
    printf("%13s(%5d): %2ld sec %6ld msec\n", #FN, ARG, sec, msec); \
} while (0)

static void test_snprintf(int i) {
    size_t len = sizeof(dst);
    char* src = (char*)malloc(len + 1);
    memset(src, 'a', len);
    src[len] = 0;

    while (i--)
        snprintf(dst, sizeof(dst), "%s", src);

    free(src);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    BENCH(test_strcpy, 10);
    BENCH(test_strcpy, 100);
    BENCH(test_strcpy, 1000);
    BENCH(test_strcpy, 10000);

    BENCH(test_strncat, 10);
    BENCH(test_strncat, 100);
    BENCH(test_strncat, 1000);
    BENCH(test_strncat, 10000);

    BENCH(test_snprintf, 10);
    BENCH(test_snprintf, 100);
    BENCH(test_snprintf, 1000);
    BENCH(test_snprintf, 10000);
    printf("\n");
}
    return 0;
}

It seems as if renz scas is the culprit, regardless of the string size. I've read that renz scas shouldn't be used for small strings because the setup cost on silicon is quite high.

9
  • 1
    _IO_vfprintf_internal is in library code; are you really recompiling glibc every time with different optimization options? See also Why is this code 6.5x slower with optimizations enabled? re: how old GCC optimizes strlen calls badly, by inlining a slow repne scasb. Presumably your glibc was built with an old GCC. – Peter Cordes Oct 29 '20 at 23:03
  • 1
    Yes, I've tried 3 different glibc versions (rebuilt them in a sandbox) with many different gcc versions. – user1016031 Oct 29 '20 at 23:13
  • 3
    printf/sprintf/snprintf, etc are expected to be slow – old_timer Oct 29 '20 at 23:15
  • 3
    printf et. al. is naturally slow--that is its nature. It's fine for error messages, but shouldn't be used in time/mission critical inner loops. If you're using it as a convenient way to do multiple concatenations (e.g. sprintf(buf,"%s/%s/%s",head,mid,tail);), you may want to use strcpy/strcat. In fact, [the non-standard, GNU specific] stpcpy can be faster (e.g.) char buf[1000]; char *bp = buf; bp = stpcpy(bp,head); *bp++ = '/'; bp = stpcpy(bp,mid); *bp++ = '/'; bp = stpcpy(bp,tail); – Craig Estey Oct 29 '20 at 23:23
  • 1
    Actually, looking at the man page, stpcpy was standardized since POSIX.1-2008, so it should be fine. It's been in glibc since 1992. It is heavily optimized to be super fast, using (e.g.) x86 SIMD instructions, etc. – Craig Estey Oct 29 '20 at 23:31

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