95

I am writing a function to plot data. I would like to specify a nice round number for the y-axis max that is greater than the max of the dataset.

Specifically, I would like a function foo that performs the following:

foo(4) == 5
foo(6.1) == 10 #maybe 7 would be better
foo(30.1) == 40
foo(100.1) == 110 

I have gotten as far as

foo <- function(x) ceiling(max(x)/10)*10

for rounding to the nearest 10, but this does not work for arbitrary rounding intervals.

Is there a better way to do this in R?

  • The R default behavior when plotting is to set the plot limits ~4% beyond the range of the data in each direction. If this isn't satisfying to you maybe just write something that goes out by a higher or lower %? – joran Jun 23 '11 at 22:39
  • @joran thanks for the info, but I want multiple plots that all have the same axis limits and ticks and I am not sure how this helps. – Abe Jun 23 '11 at 22:43
  • 1
    Well, I'm sort of groping in the dark here, since I don't know all the background. Your foo will round up to the nearest X if you just add another parameter X and replace both 10's with X. Or you could use faceting. – joran Jun 23 '11 at 22:50
  • 15
    Are you looking for ?pretty ? – hadley Jun 24 '11 at 0:24
  • Why is foo(4)==5 and not 10? – James Jun 24 '11 at 13:04

11 Answers 11

64

If you just want to round up to the nearest power of 10, then just define:

roundUp <- function(x) 10^ceiling(log10(x))

This actually also works when x is a vector:

> roundUp(c(0.0023, 3.99, 10, 1003))
[1] 1e-02 1e+01 1e+01 1e+04

..but if you want to round to a "nice" number, you first need to define what a "nice" number is. The following lets us define "nice" as a vector with nice base values from 1 to 10. The default is set to the even numbers plus 5.

roundUpNice <- function(x, nice=c(1,2,4,5,6,8,10)) {
    if(length(x) != 1) stop("'x' must be of length 1")
    10^floor(log10(x)) * nice[[which(x <= 10^floor(log10(x)) * nice)[[1]]]]
}

The above doesn't work when x is a vector - too late in the evening right now :)

> roundUpNice(0.0322)
[1] 0.04
> roundUpNice(3.22)
[1] 4
> roundUpNice(32.2)
[1] 40
> roundUpNice(42.2)
[1] 50
> roundUpNice(422.2)
[1] 500

[[EDIT]]

If the question is how to round to a specified nearest value (like 10 or 100), then James answer seems most appropriate. My version lets you take any value and automatically round it to a reasonably "nice" value. Some other good choices of the "nice" vector above are: 1:10, c(1,5,10), seq(1, 10, 0.1)

If you have a range of values in your plot, for example [3996.225, 40001.893] then the automatic way should take into account both the size of the range and the magnitude of the numbers. And as noted by Hadley, the pretty() function might be what you want.

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  • 1
    Vectorize(roundUpNice) is quite fast =) +1 Anyway. – mbq Jun 24 '11 at 9:40
  • I was wondering if there is a way to edit the roundUp function to half the end result if the original value is lower? for example a number between 101-500 would roundup to 500 and numbers 501-999 would roundUp to 1000? instead of all rounding to 1000? – helen.h Mar 11 '16 at 10:25
  • Just change the nice vector: roundUpNice(501, nice=c(5, 10)) # 1000 – Tommy Jul 7 '16 at 21:16
  • 1
    Just a warning since you work with logarithms in your function, I would had 2 cases, one where x < 0 and apply - x in the log before putting the - back. I would also add an exception for the situation where x = 0 – Yohan Obadia Sep 1 '16 at 16:29
  • The pretty function worked really well for my needs (to set a pretty limit on a graph's X axis) – Joon Apr 12 at 14:01
132

The plyr library has a function round_any that is pretty generic to do all kinds of rounding. For example

library(plyr)
round_any(132.1, 10)               # returns 130
round_any(132.1, 10, f = ceiling)  # returns 140
round_any(132.1, 5, f = ceiling)   # returns 135
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46

The round function in R assigns special meaning to the digits parameter if it is negative.

round(x, digits = 0)

Rounding to a negative number of digits means rounding to a power of ten, so for example round(x, digits = -2) rounds to the nearest hundred.

This means a function like the following gets pretty close to what you are asking for.

foo <- function(x)
{
    round(x+5,-1)
}

The output looks like the following

foo(4)
[1] 10
foo(6.1)
[1] 10
foo(30.1)
[1] 40
foo(100.1)
[1] 110
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  • 2
    Awesome! Your answer should be marked as the right one! – Alessandro Jacopson May 30 '17 at 7:15
  • +1 . However, @Alessandro the functions in my answer are much more versatile: you can round ANY number up OR down to ANY interval. – theforestecologist Jan 20 '19 at 20:56
  • @theforestecologist thank you for the hint! As a personal taste, I usually prefer a language built-in solution rather than a custom one. – Alessandro Jacopson Jan 21 '19 at 7:22
27

How about:

roundUp <- function(x,to=10)
{
  to*(x%/%to + as.logical(x%%to))
}

Which gives:

> roundUp(c(4,6.1,30.1,100.1))
[1]  10  10  40 110
> roundUp(4,5)
[1] 5
> roundUp(12,7)
[1] 14
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  • 1
    @daroczig The question is a little confusing, I wrote this focusing on the "arbitrary X" requirement, but clearly all the expected values could not be produce by "a single round up to the nearest X" solution. It seems that the OP wants to produce values for an axis, so pretty is probably the best option. – James Jun 25 '11 at 15:53
  • 1
    Obviously late to this party, but wouldn't to * ceiling(x / to) be cleaner? – jared Oct 4 '19 at 15:04
26

If you add a negative number to the digits-argument of round(), R will round it to the multiples of 10, 100 etc.

    round(9, digits = -1) 
    [1] 10    
    round(89, digits = -1) 
    [1] 90
    round(89, digits = -2) 
    [1] 100
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17

Round ANY number Up/Down to ANY interval

You can easily round numbers to a specific interval using the modulo operator %%.

The function:

round.choose <- function(x, roundTo, dir = 1) {
  if(dir == 1) {  ##ROUND UP
    x + (roundTo - x %% roundTo)
  } else {
    if(dir == 0) {  ##ROUND DOWN
      x - (x %% roundTo)
    }
  }
}

Examples:

> round.choose(17,5,1)   #round 17 UP to the next 5th
[1] 20
> round.choose(17,5,0)   #round 17 DOWN to the next 5th
[1] 15
> round.choose(17,2,1)   #round 17 UP to the next even number
[1] 18
> round.choose(17,2,0)   #round 17 DOWN to the next even number
[1] 16

How it works:

The modulo operator %% determines the remainder of dividing the first number by the 2nd. Adding or subtracting this interval to your number of interest can essentially 'round' the number to an interval of your choosing.

> 7 + (5 - 7 %% 5)       #round UP to the nearest 5
[1] 10
> 7 + (10 - 7 %% 10)     #round UP to the nearest 10
[1] 10
> 7 + (2 - 7 %% 2)       #round UP to the nearest even number
[1] 8
> 7 + (100 - 7 %% 100)   #round UP to the nearest 100
[1] 100
> 7 + (4 - 7 %% 4)       #round UP to the nearest interval of 4
[1] 8
> 7 + (4.5 - 7 %% 4.5)   #round UP to the nearest interval of 4.5
[1] 9

> 7 - (7 %% 5)           #round DOWN to the nearest 5
[1] 5
> 7 - (7 %% 10)          #round DOWN to the nearest 10
[1] 0
> 7 - (7 %% 2)           #round DOWN to the nearest even number
[1] 6

Update:

The convenient 2-argument version:

rounder <- function(x,y) {
  if(y >= 0) { x + (y - x %% y)}
  else { x - (x %% abs(y))}
}

Positive y values roundUp, while negative y values roundDown:

 # rounder(7, -4.5) = 4.5, while rounder(7, 4.5) = 9.

Or....

Function that automatically rounds UP or DOWN based on standard rounding rules:

Round <- function(x,y) {
  if((y - x %% y) <= x %% y) { x + (y - x %% y)}
  else { x - (x %% y)}
}

Automatically rounds up if the x value is > halfway between subsequent instances of the rounding value y:

# Round(1.3,1) = 1 while Round(1.6,1) = 2
# Round(1.024,0.05) = 1 while Round(1.03,0.05) = 1.05
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  • I was asked how to convert Round to VBA in Excel: Function ROUND(x,y) 'Function that automatically rounds UP or DOWN based on standard rounding rules. 'Automatically rounds up if the "x" value is > halfway between subsequent instances of the rounding value "y": If (y - (Evaluate("Mod(" & x & "," & y & ")"))) <= (Evaluate("Mod(" & x & "," & y & ")")) Then Ans = x + (y - (Evaluate("Mod(" & x & "," & y & ")"))) Else Ans = x - (Evaluate("Mod(" & x & "," & y & ")")) End If ROUND = Ans End Function – theforestecologist Dec 6 '18 at 23:42
  • @Abe I wasn't sure if you ever say my answer or not since I posted 4 years after you asked, but I think you might find my answer fairly elegant and very VERSATILE. Hope it helps! – theforestecologist May 2 at 5:57
7

Regarding the rounding up to the multiplicity of an arbitrary number, e.g. 10, here is a simple alternative to James's answer.

It works for any real number being rounded up (from) and any real positive number rounded up to (to):

> RoundUp <- function(from,to) ceiling(from/to)*to

Example:

> RoundUp(-11,10)
[1] -10
> RoundUp(-0.1,10)
[1] 0
> RoundUp(0,10)
[1] 0
> RoundUp(8.9,10)
[1] 10
> RoundUp(135,10)
[1] 140

> RoundUp(from=c(1.3,2.4,5.6),to=1.1)  
[1] 2.2 3.3 6.6
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2

I think your code just works great with a small modification:

foo <- function(x, round=10) ceiling(max(x+10^-9)/round + 1/round)*round

And your examples run:

> foo(4, round=1) == 5
[1] TRUE
> foo(6.1) == 10            #maybe 7 would be better
[1] TRUE
> foo(6.1, round=1) == 7    # you got 7
[1] TRUE
> foo(30.1) == 40
[1] TRUE
> foo(100.1) == 110
[1] TRUE
> # ALL in one:
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100))
[1] 110
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100), round=10)
[1] 110
> foo(c(4, 6.1, 30.1, 100), round=2.3)
[1] 101.2

I altered your function in two way:

  • added second argument (for your specified X )
  • added a small value (=1e-09, feel free to modify!) to the max(x) if you want a bigger number
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1

If you always want to round a number up to the nearest X, you can use the ceiling function:

#Round 354 up to the nearest 100:
> X=100
> ceiling(354/X)*X
[1] 400

#Round 47 up to the nearest 30:
> Y=30
> ceiling(47/Y)*Y
[1] 60

Similarly, if you always want to round down, use the floor function. If you want to simply round up or down to the nearest Z, use round instead.

> Z=5
> round(367.8/Z)*Z
[1] 370
> round(367.2/Z)*Z
[1] 365
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0

You will find an upgraded version of Tommy's answer that takes into account several cases:

  • Choosing between lower or higher bound
  • Taking into account negative and zero values
  • two different nice scale in case you want the function to round differently small and big numbers. Example: 4 would be rounded at 0 while 400 would be rounded at 400.

Below the code :

round.up.nice <- function(x, lower_bound = TRUE, nice_small=c(0,5,10), nice_big=c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)) {
  if (abs(x) > 100) {
    nice = nice_big
  } else {
    nice = nice_small
  }
  if (lower_bound == TRUE) {
    if (x > 0) {
      return(10^floor(log10(x)) * nice[[max(which(x >= 10^floor(log10(x)) * nice))[[1]]]])
    } else if (x < 0) {
      return(- 10^floor(log10(-x)) * nice[[min(which(-x <= 10^floor(log10(-x)) * nice))[[1]]]])
    } else {
      return(0)
    }
  } else {
    if (x > 0) {
      return(10^floor(log10(x)) * nice[[min(which(x <= 10^floor(log10(x)) * nice))[[1]]]])
    } else if (x < 0) {
      return(- 10^floor(log10(-x)) * nice[[max(which(-x >= 10^floor(log10(-x)) * nice))[[1]]]])
    } else {
      return(0)
    }
  }
}
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  • The default output of this is a round down: > round.up.nice(.01) [1] 0 > round.up.nice(4.5) [1] 0 > round.up.nice(56) [1] 50 – jessi Feb 19 '17 at 23:38
  • I think part of the problem is that nice_big and nice_small are defined backwards, (if we flip them in the function, round.up.nice(4.5) becomes 4) but it still rounds down. – jessi Feb 19 '17 at 23:48
0

I tried this without using any external library or cryptic features and it works!

Hope it helps someone.

ceil <- function(val, multiple){
  div = val/multiple
  int_div = as.integer(div)
  return (int_div * multiple + ceiling(div - int_div) * multiple)
}

> ceil(2.1, 2.2)
[1] 2.2
> ceil(3, 2.2)
[1] 4.4
> ceil(5, 10)
[1] 10
> ceil(0, 10)
[1] 0
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