0

It is quite easy to select a value based on a condition mask with for example less than or greater than:

using vec4_t __attribute__((vector_size(4*sizeof(float)))) = float;

inline auto chooseValIfInRange(vec4_t val, vec4_t if_too_small, vec4_t if_too_large)
{
    return val < vec4_t{0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f}?
        val_small
        : (val > vec4_t{1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f}?
            val_large : val);
}

The above will return if_too_small for vector components less than 0.0f, if_too_large if the vector component is greater than 1.0f, and val if it is between 0.0f and 1.0f inclusive. Would it be possible to choose a third value for nan without any branch? If so, how?

  • Remark: you don't need to create explicitly a vector of 0s, g++ understands val < 0.0f just fine. I see you have the tag "intrinsics", does that mean you are interested in an x86-only answer using _mm_* functions? – Marc Glisse Oct 30 '20 at 20:16
  • @MargClisse: It means that I would accept such an answer (for now at least, since I am targeting my amd64 PC). – user877329 Oct 30 '20 at 20:23
4

You can exploit the fact that only for val=NaN both val>=0 and val<=1 are false:

using vec4_t __attribute__((vector_size(4*sizeof(float)))) = float;
    
auto chooseValIfInRange(vec4_t val, vec4_t val_small, vec4_t val_large, vec4_t val_nan)
{
    return val >=  0.0f
        ? ( val <= 1.0f ? val       : val_large)
        : ( val <= 1.0f ? val_small : val_nan  )
    ;
}

The val <= 1.0f comparison will be executed only once when optimizations are enabled: https://godbolt.org/z/Pcjezq

  • @MarcGlisse True, but the question actually did not ask anything about -ffast-math. If that is activated, I agree with your comments, that you are in UB territory ... – chtz Oct 30 '20 at 20:34
  • Oh sorry, I was mislead by the discussions elsewhere, you are right. Using the same val<=1 in both branches is a nice trick! – Marc Glisse Oct 30 '20 at 20:39
0

Using f != f will be true only if f is NaN

(untested code)

inline auto chooseValIfInRange(vec4_t val, vec4_t if_too_small, vec4_t if_too_large)
{
    return val < vec4_t{0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f}?
        val_small
        : (val > vec4_t{1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f}?
            val_large 
        : ((val != val) ? val_nan : val));
}
  • This works, but not if fast-math is turned on. Is it possible to make it work with fast-math? – user877329 Oct 30 '20 at 19:41
  • 4
    That doesn't make sense, fast-math is you telling the compiler that you don't care about NaN (among other things). – Marc Glisse Oct 30 '20 at 19:57
  • 1
    The warning is pretty clear, you misspelled -fno-fast-math. That would work, but it might have unintended consequences (preventing function inlining, or disabling fast-math in the whole function this gets inlined into). If you have a NaN anywhere with fast-math, you already have undefined behavior. – Marc Glisse Oct 30 '20 at 20:24
  • 1
    @user877329 don't use the comments to ask entirely new questions. Your original post does not mention -ffast-math at all. – chtz Oct 30 '20 at 21:33
  • 1
    If you care about things like NaN, never use -ffast-math. – Sneftel Oct 30 '20 at 23:26

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