6

In the GitHub actions 'Events that trigger workflows' documentation there are multiple ways listed, like on specific branches and specific path changes. Is there a way to combine those two using an AND?

As far as I understand the following syntax would trigger the run if the push is either to the master branch OR to the specific path. Is it possible to say that both criteria must be fulfilled to trigger the action?

on:
  push:
    branches:
    - master
    paths:
    - 'app/*'

Note: I am not looking for a hacky solution like letting it trigger on the path and then checking in the step if the branch is the master branch. I know that this is possible, but you would need to do it for each step and it isn't elegant at all.

1
  • 1
    It's an AND for me now, and it was an AND for me the last time I checked in August 2020. Have you tested this out and verified that you get OR? Now, within the branches or paths when you have multiple listed, that is OR.
    – per1234
    Mar 2, 2021 at 4:18

2 Answers 2

3

Your specific request does not appear to be supported by the syntax.

I read through the workflow syntax for GitHub Actions documentation and the two trigger configurations appear unrelated.

2
  • Yes this is sadly what I suspected. I read through that documentation too and it doesn't appear. Thank you for your effort! I will probably accept this answer, maybe they will add such a feature in the future.
    – creyD
    Oct 31, 2020 at 15:59
  • GitHub allows free users to open support requests. You could always make a feature request at support.github.com/contact
    – Sam Gleske
    Oct 31, 2020 at 16:02
2

Closest workaround I've found is something like this

name: only on master but when the POM changes

on:
  push:
    paths:
      - 'pom.xml'

jobs:
  build_pom:
    if: ${{ github.ref == 'refs/heads/master' }}
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
    [...]

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