1

I've never needed to do this in Ruby, but my boss, being a C programmer, has put to me a problem that I honestly can't provide an elegant solution for in Ruby, without basically doing it in the C way (tracking a variable an using two "break" statements).

We have a situation like this (parsing XML):

(1..1000).each do |page|
  fetch_page(page).results.each do |results|
    do_something_with_results!
    break if results[:some_value] > another_value # this needs to exit BOTH blocks
  end
end

The only way I could do this is in a way that I would not describe as being very Ruby-like, and more a C way of thinking. Something like:

(1..1000).each do |page|
  should_break = false
  fetch_page(page).results.each do |results|
    do_something_with_results!
    if results[:some_value] > another_value
      should_break = true
      break
    end
  end
  break if should_break
end

That to me feels completely wrong and un-Ruby-like, but what's the functional approach?

3
  • Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1352120/… Commented Jun 24, 2011 at 4:32
  • 3
    While throw & catch are the Ruby keywords designed for this situation, first check if you can wrap this code in its own method and use return to break out. Usually it gives more readable/testable code. Commented Jun 24, 2011 at 4:40
  • @Jordan: the possible duplicate discusses only procedural programming styles of fixing the problem. Commented Jun 24, 2011 at 4:43

2 Answers 2

4
catch (:break) do
  (1..1000).each do |page|
    fetch_page(page).results.each do |results|
      do_something_with_results!
      throw :break if results[:some_value] > another_value # this needs to exit BOTH blocks
    end
  end
end

EDIT: @CaptainPete's comment above is spot on. If you can make it into a function, it has significant side benefits (unit testing being the primary one).

1
  • Wow, I remember reading this when I read a ruby book front to back, but never have I actually seen it used :) Thanks.
    – d11wtq
    Commented Jun 24, 2011 at 4:41
-1

It depends on your circumstances.

If the data sets aren't too large, you could do

results = (1..1000).map{|page_number| fetch_page(page_number).results}.flatten(1)
results.each do
  do_something_with_results!
  break if results[:some_value] > another_value # this needs to exit BOTH blocks
end

otherwise you'd have to do something to make it more lazy, such as

def each_result(page_numbers)
  page_numbers.each do |page_number|
    fetch_page(page_number).results.each do |result|
      yield result
    end
  end
end

and I'm sure there are many other ways for making something lazy.

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