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I am writing a simple matrix library and I have stumbled into a solution that brings up an opportunity to learn about the purpose of cuts.

boolean_mult(1,1,1).
boolean_mult(1,0,0).
boolean_mult(0,1,0).
boolean_mult(0,0,0).

binary_dot_product([B1],[B2],Solution) :-
    boolean_mult(B1,B2,Solution).
binary_dot_product([1|_],[1|_],1). % computation can end here.
binary_dot_product([_|B1s],[_|B2s],Solution) :-
    binary_dot_product(B1s,B2s,Solution).

This solution makes sense from a declarative perspective. Given two lists of 1's and 0's, B1 and B2, if the boolean product of their heads is 1 then the dot product of the lists is 1. Otherwise take the dot product of their tails. The dot product of singleton lists is the boolean product of the two elements.

The problem that I am having though is shown in this query:

?- binary_dot_product([1,0,1],[1,1,1],X).
X = 1 ;
X = 1 ;
X = 1.

I am able to backtrack three times, which from a declarative perspective does not make sense. There can only be one dot product! Not 3!

I can easily fix this problem with the use of a cut:

binary_dot_product([B1],[B2],Solution) :-
    boolean_mult(B1,B2,Solution).
binary_dot_product([1|_],[1|_],1) :- !. 
binary_dot_product([_|B1s],[_|B2s],Solution) :-
    binary_dot_product(B1s,B2s,Solution).

And now:

?- binary_dot_product([1,0,1],[1,1,1],X).
X = 1.

Up to this point in my Prolog career I have avoided cuts like the plague as I have been warned about their dangers. In this situation though I feel like a cut makes a lot of sense.

What am I gaining and losing from a use of a cut in the above code?

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  • The question you should be asking is what type of cut is bad and why, red or green. Or sometimes red, green or blue.
    – Guy Coder
    Nov 1, 2020 at 18:58
  • 2
    Isn't this definition missing a use of boolean_add and possibly some more conditions? For example: ?- binary_dot_product([1, 1], [1, 0], Product). Product = 1 ; Product = 0 ; false. This doesn't yet make complete sense from a declarative perspective either. Nov 2, 2020 at 8:30
  • Since the title of your question is very broad please consider making it more specific to the problem. Right now it will attract lots of attention but the details of the question are so much more specific than the title. I am seriously considering down voting this because of the title being to broad.
    – Guy Coder
    Nov 2, 2020 at 9:45
  • @IsabelleNewbie I see that this is incorrect now, in fact the cut actually makes the predicate correct in this scenario. Nov 2, 2020 at 13:28
  • 2
    You're still not using boolean_add. A dot product without adding up the individual parts is strange and probably incorrect. You're also not checking for equal length lists. A dot product on vectors of different lengths is strange and should probably be undefined (i.e., fail). Nov 2, 2020 at 14:26

1 Answer 1

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EDIT (since OP insisted ;-)

I am answering this question:

What am I gaining and losing from a use of a cut in the above code?

I am not sure what you are gaining. You are losing the ability to ask more general questions that you get for free if you do not use cuts in your code.

In the general case, getting the same correct solution more than once is a strong indication that your code, with or without cuts, is either redundant or plain wrong. This is not universally true of course but from experience, it is true often enough.


You shouldn't "avoid cuts like the plague". You should use cuts when you need them, and not use them when you don't need them.

This is too big of a topic to answer on SO. Every decent Prolog textbook explains cuts and discusses when you need them and why; and use your judgement, which will improve as you program.

However: if your program is incorrect without cuts, cuts will not fix it.


Consider those problems.

  1. Given two boolean vectors, what is their dot product?

  2. Implement a predicate with three arguments. The first two arguments are boolean vectors, and the third argument is the dot product.

In Prolog-land, the second problem assumes that you can ask questions like "given one vector and a dot product, what is the other vector?" Can either one of your current implementations do that? And are you going to ask such questions? And even if you didn't think you are going to ask such question, given that you could do it, could you come up with uses for it? Do you see where this is going?


Now, your code. There are issues with it (see for example the comment that Isabelle Newbie just made).

This does not give wrong results:

:- module(boolean, [add/3, mult/3, dot_product/3]).

add(1,1,1).
add(1,0,1).
add(0,1,1).
add(0,0,0).

mult(1,1,1).
mult(1,0,0).
mult(0,1,0).
mult(0,0,0).

dot_product(V1, V2, P) :-
    same_length(V1, V2),
    maplist(mult, V1, V2, [H|T]),
    foldl(add, T, H, P).

Using it:

?- use_module(boolean).
true.

?- dot_product([1,0,1],[1,1,1],P).
P = 1 ;
false.

?- dot_product([1, 1], [1, 0], Product).
Product = 1 ;
false.

?- dot_product([1, 1], V2, 1).
V2 = [1, 1] ;
V2 = [1, 0] ;
V2 = [0, 1] ;
false.

?- dot_product(V1, V2, 1).
V1 = V2, V2 = [1] ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [1, 1] ;
V1 = [1, 1],
V2 = [1, 0] ;
V1 = [1, 0],
V2 = [1, 1] ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [1, 0] ;
V1 = [1, 1],
V2 = [0, 1] ;
V1 = [0, 1],
V2 = [1, 1] ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [0, 1] ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [1, 1, 1] ;
V1 = [1, 1, 1],
V2 = [1, 1, 0] .

?- dot_product(V1, V2, P).
V1 = V2, V2 = [1],
P = 1 ;
V1 = [1],
V2 = [0],
P = 0 ;
V1 = [0],
V2 = [1],
P = 0 ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [0],
P = 0 ;
V1 = V2, V2 = [1, 1],
P = 1 ;
V1 = [1, 1],
V2 = [1, 0],
P = 1 ;
V1 = [1, 0],
V2 = [1, 1],
P = 1 .

EDIT2: There is still a choice point left after the last correct answer. To get rid of it, you can use tabling (as available in SWI-Prolog, for example). Make both add/3 and mult/3 tables, like this (before defining them):

:- table add/3, mult/3.

No more "false"s:

?- dot_product([1,0,1],[1,1,1],P).
P = 1.

?- dot_product(V1, [1, 0], 0).
V1 = [0, 1] ;
V1 = [0, 0].

The "same length" seems important enough; since there are no cuts, you can use the predicate to "generate-and-test". Anyway, dot product is only defined for vectors of the same length, isn't that so?

I made no attempt at optimizing the code. As you observe in your question, you can short-cut if the arguments are ground. This would be a good use of a cut (or an if-then-else): if arguments are ground, look for any "1" in any of the vectors; otherwise, use generic algorithm.

To check for "1" in a ground list, you could use memberchk(1, List).

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  • Thank you for the answer but I had originally chosen a poor title for the question of this post. I edited the title and your answer now does not address the question. If you make an edit to answer the title I will accept this answer. Nov 2, 2020 at 13:35
  • @NicholasHubbard I think I understood your question even before you re-worded it. You should maybe read carefully my answer, then read the solution I propose (which isn't perfect but at least it isn't wrong), and think about it.
    – TA_intern
    Nov 2, 2020 at 13:42
  • @NicholasHubbard Note that with the working solution in my answer, you do not get redundant solutions.
    – TA_intern
    Nov 2, 2020 at 13:50
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    @TA_intern: while memberchk/2 does work in the case you mention there are cleaner ways with roughly the same efficiency and without any restrictions
    – false
    Nov 2, 2020 at 14:11
  • @NicholasHubbard I added a small edit, you can get rid of the unnecessary choice point with tabling (and still no cuts ;-) if it is available in the Prolog you are using.
    – TA_intern
    Nov 3, 2020 at 6:41

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