32

How do I get the IP address of the server that calls my ASP.NET page? I have seen stuff about a Response object, but am very new at c#. Thanks a ton.

54

This should work:

 //this gets the ip address of the server pc

  public string GetIPAddress()
  {
     IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()); // `Dns.Resolve()` method is deprecated.
     IPAddress ipAddress = ipHostInfo.AddressList[0];

     return ipAddress.ToString();
  }

http://wec-library.blogspot.com/2008/03/gets-ip-address-of-server-pc-using-c.html

OR

 //while this gets the ip address of the visitor making the call
  HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress;

http://www.geekpedia.com/KB32_How-do-I-get-the-visitors-IP-address.html

  • 5
    Those two code blocks do completely different things. – Martin Mar 14 '09 at 19:24
  • 7
    The top code block gets the IP address of the server that the code is running on. The bottom code block gets the IP address of the visitor who makes the request. – Martin Mar 14 '09 at 19:29
  • 1
    It even shows the difference in the names of the link.so that was no reason to downvote me – TStamper Mar 14 '09 at 19:47
  • 1
    I removed the downvote, but I think you should edit the answer to make it clear which code block does what. What happens if both those websites dissappear off the internet in a few months when someone is looking at this answer? – Martin Mar 14 '09 at 19:50
  • 3
    Dns.Resolve is obsolete you should use Dns.GetHostEntry(strHostName) instead – Alberto León Nov 28 '11 at 15:47
32

Request.ServerVariables["LOCAL_ADDR"];

This gives the IP the request came in on for multi-homed servers

  • 2
    This is also the most efficient and stable method. If you're using System.Net.Dns you're doing it wrong. – Shaun Wilson Sep 18 '13 at 19:40
  • 1
    More specifically: System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.ServerVariables["LOCAL_ADDR"]; – Chris Fremgen May 11 '16 at 15:14
13

The above is slow as it requires a DNS call (and will obviously not work if one is not available). You can use the code below to get a map of the current pc's local IPV4 addresses with their corresponding subnet mask:

public static Dictionary<IPAddress, IPAddress> GetAllNetworkInterfaceIpv4Addresses()
{
    var map = new Dictionary<IPAddress, IPAddress>();

    foreach (var ni in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces())
    {
        foreach (var uipi in ni.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses)
        {
            if (uipi.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork) continue;

            if (uipi.IPv4Mask == null) continue; //ignore 127.0.0.1
            map[uipi.Address] = uipi.IPv4Mask;
        }
    }
    return map;
}

warning: this is not implemented in Mono yet

  • And... with this code... how do you check which is the server that is running a site? I think... I have a production and a replication server, how do I store the ip or ips to check wich is the server? – Alberto León Nov 30 '11 at 10:46
  • I think this answer is headed in the right direction. Servers can have multiple network adapters, and host name alone can give you the wrong info depending on the server setup. The other answers can and will work in some situations, but this is the answer that makes you better think and understand your environment. – Nick Jan 31 '16 at 20:54
7
  //this gets the ip address of the server pc
  public string GetIPAddress()
  {
     string strHostName = System.Net.Dns.GetHostName();
     //IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName()); <-- Obsolete
     IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.GetHostEntry(strHostName);
     IPAddress ipAddress = ipHostInfo.AddressList[0];

     return ipAddress.ToString();
  }
3

This will work for IPv4:

public static string GetServerIP()
{            
    IPHostEntry ipHostInfo = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());

    foreach (IPAddress address in ipHostInfo.AddressList)
    {
        if (address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
            return address.ToString();
    }

    return string.Empty;
}
  • This code worked for me. – TuanDPH Mar 7 at 9:09

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