114

I've recently started using ElasticSearch and I can't seem to make it search for a part of a word.

Example: I have three documents from my couchdb indexed in ElasticSearch:

{
  "_id" : "1",
  "name" : "John Doeman",
  "function" : "Janitor"
}
{
  "_id" : "2",
  "name" : "Jane Doewoman",
  "function" : "Teacher"
}
{
  "_id" : "3",
  "name" : "Jimmy Jackal",
  "function" : "Student"
} 

So now, I want to search for all documents containing "Doe"

curl http://localhost:9200/my_idx/my_type/_search?q=Doe

That doesn't return any hits. But if I search for

curl http://localhost:9200/my_idx/my_type/_search?q=Doeman

It does return one document (John Doeman).

I've tried setting different analyzers and different filters as properties of my index. I've also tried using a full blown query (for example:

{
  "query": {
    "term": {
      "name": "Doe"
    }
  }
}

) But nothing seems to work.

How can I make ElasticSearch find both John Doeman and Jane Doewoman when I search for "Doe" ?

UPDATE

I tried to use the nGram tokenizer and filter, like Igor proposed, like this:

{
  "index": {
    "index": "my_idx",
    "type": "my_type",
    "bulk_size": "100",
    "bulk_timeout": "10ms",
    "analysis": {
      "analyzer": {
        "my_analyzer": {
          "type": "custom",
          "tokenizer": "my_ngram_tokenizer",
          "filter": [
            "my_ngram_filter"
          ]
        }
      },
      "filter": {
        "my_ngram_filter": {
          "type": "nGram",
          "min_gram": 1,
          "max_gram": 1
        }
      },
      "tokenizer": {
        "my_ngram_tokenizer": {
          "type": "nGram",
          "min_gram": 1,
          "max_gram": 1
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

The problem I'm having now is that each and every query returns ALL documents. Any pointers? ElasticSearch documentation on using nGram isn't great...

  • 9
    no wonder, you habe min/max ngram set to 1, so 1 letter :) – Martin B. May 14 '14 at 14:38
79

I'm using nGram, too. I use standard tokenizer and nGram just as a filter. Here is my setup:

{
  "index": {
    "index": "my_idx",
    "type": "my_type",
    "analysis": {
      "index_analyzer": {
        "my_index_analyzer": {
          "type": "custom",
          "tokenizer": "standard",
          "filter": [
            "lowercase",
            "mynGram"
          ]
        }
      },
      "search_analyzer": {
        "my_search_analyzer": {
          "type": "custom",
          "tokenizer": "standard",
          "filter": [
            "standard",
            "lowercase",
            "mynGram"
          ]
        }
      },
      "filter": {
        "mynGram": {
          "type": "nGram",
          "min_gram": 2,
          "max_gram": 50
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Let's you find word parts up to 50 letters. Adjust the max_gram as you need. In german words can get really big, so I set it to a high value.

60

Searching with leading and trailing wildcards is going to be extremely slow on a large index. If you want to be able to search by word prefix, remove leading wildcard. If you really need to find a substring in a middle of a word, you would be better of using ngram tokenizer.

  • 13
    Igor is right. At least remove the leading *. For NGram ElasticSearch example, see this gist: gist.github.com/988923 – karmi Jun 24 '11 at 19:08
  • 3
    @karmi: Thanks for your complete example! Perhaps you want to add your comment as an actual answer, it's what got it working for me and what I would want to upvote. – Fabian Steeg Nov 12 '12 at 15:46
38

I think there's no need to change any mapping. Try to use query_string, it's perfect. All scenarios will work with default standard analyzer:

We have data:

{"_id" : "1","name" : "John Doeman","function" : "Janitor"}
{"_id" : "2","name" : "Jane Doewoman","function" : "Teacher"}

Scenario 1:

{"query": {
    "query_string" : {"default_field" : "name", "query" : "*Doe*"}
} }

Response:

{"_id" : "1","name" : "John Doeman","function" : "Janitor"}
{"_id" : "2","name" : "Jane Doewoman","function" : "Teacher"}

Scenario 2:

{"query": {
    "query_string" : {"default_field" : "name", "query" : "*Jan*"}
} }

Response:

{"_id" : "1","name" : "John Doeman","function" : "Janitor"}

Scenario 3:

{"query": {
    "query_string" : {"default_field" : "name", "query" : "*oh* *oe*"}
} }

Response:

{"_id" : "1","name" : "John Doeman","function" : "Janitor"}
{"_id" : "2","name" : "Jane Doewoman","function" : "Teacher"}

EDIT - Same implementation with spring data elastic search https://stackoverflow.com/a/43579948/2357869

One more explanation how query_string is better than others https://stackoverflow.com/a/43321606/2357869

12

without changing your index mappings you could do a simple prefix query that will do partial searches like you are hoping for

ie.

{
  "query": { 
    "prefix" : { "name" : "Doe" }
  }
}

https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/elasticsearch/reference/current/query-dsl-prefix-query.html

  • That works, thanks for posting! – James Drinkard Nov 22 '17 at 16:43
  • can you do multi field search using prefix query? – batmaci Oct 22 '18 at 15:09
  • Thanks, just what I was looking for! Any thoughts on performance impact? – Vingtoft Aug 28 at 9:04
5

Try the solution with is described here: Exact Substring Searches in ElasticSearch

{
    "mappings": {
        "my_type": {
            "index_analyzer":"index_ngram",
            "search_analyzer":"search_ngram"
        }
    },
    "settings": {
        "analysis": {
            "filter": {
                "ngram_filter": {
                    "type": "ngram",
                    "min_gram": 3,
                    "max_gram": 8
                }
            },
            "analyzer": {
                "index_ngram": {
                    "type": "custom",
                    "tokenizer": "keyword",
                    "filter": [ "ngram_filter", "lowercase" ]
                },
                "search_ngram": {
                    "type": "custom",
                    "tokenizer": "keyword",
                    "filter": "lowercase"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

To solve the disk usage problem and the too-long search term problem short 8 characters long ngrams are used (configured with: "max_gram": 8). To search for terms with more than 8 characters, turn your search into a boolean AND query looking for every distinct 8-character substring in that string. For example, if a user searched for large yard (a 10-character string), the search would be:

"arge ya AND arge yar AND rge yard.

  • 2
    dead link, pls fix – DarkMukke Sep 12 '17 at 11:45
2

If you want to implement autocomplete functionality, then Completion Suggester is the most neat solution. The next blog post contains a very clear description how this works.

In two words, it's an in-memory data structure called an FST which contains valid suggestions and is optimised for fast retrieval and memory usage. Essentially, it is just a graph. For instance, and FST containing the words hotel, marriot, mercure, munchen and munich would look like this:

enter image description here

2

you can use regexp.

{ "_id" : "1", "name" : "John Doeman" , "function" : "Janitor"}
{ "_id" : "2", "name" : "Jane Doewoman","function" : "Teacher"  }
{ "_id" : "3", "name" : "Jimmy Jackal" ,"function" : "Student"  } 

if you use this query :

{
  "query": {
    "regexp": {
      "name": "J.*"
    }
  }
}

you will given all of data that their name start with "J".Consider you want to receive just the first two record that their name end with "man" so you can use this query :

{
  "query": { 
    "regexp": {
      "name": ".*man"
    }
  }
}

and if you want to receive all record that in their name exist "m" , you can use this query :

{
  "query": { 
    "regexp": {
      "name": ".*m.*"
    }
  }
}

This works for me .And I hope my answer be suitable for solve your problem.

0

Using wilcards (*) prevent the calc of a score

  • Could you add more details to your answer? Provide a sample code or reference to documentation on what this does. – Cray Jul 1 at 16:07
-7

Nevermind.

I had to look at the Lucene documentation. Seems I can use wildcards! :-)

curl http://localhost:9200/my_idx/my_type/_search?q=*Doe*

does the trick!

  • 11
    See @imotov answer. The use of wildcards is not going to scale well at all. – Mike Munroe Jun 5 '12 at 11:19
  • 5
    @Idx - See how your own answer is downvoted. Downvotes represents how quality and relevancy of an answer. Could you spare a minute to accept the right answer? At least new users would be grateful to you. – asyncwait Dec 26 '13 at 14:43
  • 2
    Enough downvotes. OP made clear what the best answer is now. +1 for sharing what seemed to be the best answer before someone posted a better one. – s.Daniel Mar 17 '15 at 10:05

protected by cassiomolin Feb 26 at 19:30

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