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I recently started managing a project on GitHub where people have been submitting pull requests. Rather than merge them to master, I would like the ability to:

  1. First vet them to make sure they actually work

  2. Possibly making some stylistic changes before merging to master

How can I do this?

Do you have to make a separate branch, such as "dev", and instruct people to code against that before you merge to master?

21

There is a github help page on this which details how to make changes to a pull request by checking out pull requests locally.

What I might try is first creating a remote for the pull request submitter (I'm using the examples from the above page):

git remote add kneath git://github.com/kneath/jobs.git

Fetch the changes:

git fetch kneath

Check out the branch in question (ex. master):

git checkout kneath/master

Vet them however you like, since the code that will be there will be the pull request code. Run tests, etc.

Merge them in if you're good to go:

git checkout master
git merge kneath/master

Further, here is a very good page on git project management workflows which details the various workflows one can take on collaboration integration.

  • 2
    You actually don't even need that many commands. Click the (i) on the left side of the merge bar and it will give you all the commands you need. – Tekkub Jun 25 '11 at 1:15
  • Oh okay, like I said I just took them from the github help page I linked to. I defer to your knowledge though since I'm sure you know more. – Jorge Israel Peña Jun 25 '11 at 1:23
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A faster way of doing things with GitHub is to use this GitHub feature presented by Zach Holman in his GitHub Secrets II Talk (video).

git fetch origin pull/id/head:name

Where id is the pull request id, head is the remote branch (on the fork), and name is the name you want to give the local branch. For example:

git fetch origin pull/12/head:pr

Fetches pull request #12 into a branch named pr.

You can add this as an alias in git if you use this a lot.

  • 5
    Nice trick. The head string is actually head though, not the branch name (f.i. master). – whyscream Mar 28 '15 at 12:58

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