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I want to use a mutex which will be used to synchronize access to some variables residing in the memory shared b/w two different processes. How can I achieve that. Code sample to perform that will be very appreciated.

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    Why does your title say "pthreads" but you are asking about "processes"? How are you sharing memory between processes anyway, with memory mapping? – Kerrek SB Jun 25 '11 at 11:52
  • I'm sharing memory by allocating it before forking. So one process is the parent and the other is child. By pthread, I meant using pthread_mutex_lock. – MetallicPriest Jun 25 '11 at 12:08
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    I think fork creates copies of the memory, so it's not exactly "shared". – Kerrek SB Jun 25 '11 at 12:11
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    Kerrek SB, actually i attach shared memory by using shmget and shmat before forking, so they get mapped to the same address in both processes! – MetallicPriest Jun 25 '11 at 12:16
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    @KerrekSB Operating systems don't care as much as you probably think about the distinction between threads and processes. In Linux, they are all 'clone'd anyways. – Jeff Feb 12 '15 at 14:15
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Use a POSIX semaphore initialized to 1 instead. (See below) Use sem_init for unnamed semaphores or sem_open for named ones.

sem_t sem;

/* initialize using sem_init or sem_open */

sem_wait(&sem);
/* critical region */
sem_post(&sem);

Many years after initially posting this answer, it has to be updated.

Mutexes should actually be used instead of semaphores. R and kuga's comments (copied verbatim below) explain why. In particular I find kuga's mention that mutexes can only be posted by their locking thread most compelling.


R

sem_init requires a nonzero pshared argument to be shared, just like a mutex would require the pshared attribute. There's no reason to prefer semaphores over mutexes for this, and in fact mutexes would be better because you could use a robust mutex which allows you to handle the (very real!) case where one process dies while holding the lock.

kuga

Additionally to R..`s post, a mutex can only be posted by the thread that locks it. This is often required and a semaphore does not provide this feature. So this is not the correct answer, Jeff´s answer should be flagged as the correct answer.

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  • @MetallicPriest Enough for what ? Put more effort into your questions – cnicutar Jun 25 '11 at 12:34
  • I mean, would the variable of type sem_t require some special initialization to make it work for inter process communication. – MetallicPriest Jun 25 '11 at 12:38
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    Did you actually read my answer ? "Use sem_init for unnamed semaphores or sem_open for named ones". – cnicutar Jun 25 '11 at 12:39
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    sem_init requires a nonzero pshared argument to be shared, just like a mutex would require the pshared attribute. There's no reason to prefer semaphores over mutexes for this, and in fact mutexes would be better because you could use a robust mutex which allows you to handle the (very real!) case where one process dies while holding the lock. – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Jun 25 '11 at 13:58
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    -1 as a justification on why sem_t should be preferred over pthread mutexes is missing, or, alternatively, a note on the possibility of using pthread mutexes. – Vincenzo Pii Apr 3 '13 at 14:53
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The following example demonstrates the creation, use and destruction of a Pthread interprocess mutex. Generalizing the example for multiple processes is left as an exercise for the reader.

#include <pthread.h>

pthread_mutex_t shm_mutex;

int main(void)
{
    int err;
    pthread_mutexattr_t attr;
    err = pthread_mutexattr_init(&attr); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutexattr_setpshared(&attr, PTHREAD_PROCESS_SHARED); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutex_init(&shm_mutex, &attr); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutexattr_destroy(&attr); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutex_lock(&shm_mutex); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutex_unlock(&shm_mutex); if (err) return err;
    err = pthread_mutex_destroy(&shm_mutex); if (err) return err;
    return 0;
}
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  • It would be nice to know why folks downvote this answer. I don't show how to create processes because that is a mostly orthogonal issue. It's also context-dependent. I'm an HPC programmer, so I create processes with MPI. Others might want an example using fork() or exec(). I'm less qualified to write those examples. – Jeff Dec 31 '19 at 17:21
  • because it is wrong! The mutex must be placed at shared memory(anoymous or file mapped) but not a global var. – Changbin Du Feb 24 at 7:36
  • Do you notice that the code is demonstrating the API usage and very explicitly not showing a complete example? Hence the part that is left as an exercise to the reader? – Jeff Feb 24 at 11:05
  • This even is not a good demo. Declaring shm_mutex as a simple global var won't work. This can confuse readers. – Changbin Du Feb 25 at 12:39
  • You are correct that my code cannot be copy-pasted into a nontrivial application, but it is correct as written, because a global variable is legal when the code runs as a single process, which is explicitly stated in the answer already. If you have something constructive to say, why not answer the question yourself with something that meets your standards. – Jeff Feb 25 at 19:06

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