31

Is it possible to use a public init accessor and a private setter on the same property?

Currently I get error CS1007 "Property accessor already defined".

public record Stuff
{
    public int MyProperty { get; init; private set; } // Error

    public void SetMyProperty(int value) => MyProperty = value;
}

var stuff = new Stuff
{
    MyProperty = 3, // Using the init accessor
};

stuff.SetMyProperty(4); // Using the private setter (indirectly)

My best guess would be to use a private member variable, a property for that variable with get and init accessors (not auto-implemented) and the setter member function. Can it be done more easily?

5
  • What's the point of this? You're trying to specify the setter twice. init is a setter too Nov 11, 2020 at 9:48
  • 2
    It's not possible, no. The init accessor uses the same set_MyProperty set method as a set accessor: it's just decorated with a modreq.
    – canton7
    Nov 11, 2020 at 9:49
  • 9
    The whole idea of init is to make the property immutable. Having a setter defeats that purpose
    – Jerry
    Nov 11, 2020 at 9:49
  • 4
    The goal is to have "mostly immutable" objects, where the thumb rule is immutability but there are a few well defined exceptions. We can use with, but that does not make any logic (e.g. consistency checks) possible. Nov 11, 2020 at 9:54
  • 1
    I guess the best solution I could suggest for that would be to use a private setter and set the initial value through a constructor.
    – Jerry
    Nov 11, 2020 at 10:08

4 Answers 4

43

Similar to specifying a constructor to initialize your value, you can use a private backing field so that you can still take advantage of the init logic and allow initialization without a specific constructor

public record Stuff
{
    private int _myProperty;

    public int MyProperty { get => _myProperty; init => _myProperty = value; }

    public void SetMyProperty(int value) => _myProperty = value;
}

var stuff = new Stuff
{
    MyProperty = 3 // Using the init accessor
};

stuff.SetMyProperty(4); // Using the private setter (indirectly)
7

No you can not. The init keyword was added in an attempt to make immutable properties on objects.

So if you have the record:

public record Stuff
{
    public int MyProperty { get; init; } // This can not be changed after initialization
}

MyProperty can only be set during the initialization of your record.

If you want your property to be mutable then you use the set accessor instead of init.

public record Stuff
{
    public int MyProperty { get; set; } // This can
}
1
  • 1
    Thank you Hasan, I did mean set
    – Jerry
    Nov 11, 2020 at 9:59
2

As @Jerry's answer you can not use both setters. That is to do with the mutability of the record/object.

If you want to have private seters and some initialization logic also, the way I use is constructors:

public record Stuff
{
    public Stuff(int myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty = myProperty;
    }

    public int MyProperty { get; private set; }

    public void SetMyProperty(int value) => MyProperty = value;
}

var stuff = new Stuff(3);
stuff.SetMyProperty(4);

It is all about domain requirements.

  • Does Stuff.MyProperty needs to be publicly modifiable?
  • If it is, what would be the default value of that property, when Stuff instance is initialized? Does domain expects a default value?

etc..

1

In case you have a record with multiple properties and wish to change the accessibility of the setter for only a few of them, you can use the following syntax:

public sealed record Stuff(int MyProperty, string ImutableProperty, DateTimeOffset AnotherProperty)
{
    public int MyProperty { get; private set; } = MyProperty;   
    public DateTimeOffset AnotherProperty { get; set; } = AnotherProperty;
        
    public void SetMyProperty(int value) => MyProperty = value;
}

In this code, MyProperty has a private setter, so it can only be set within the class, AnotherProperty has a public setter, allowing it to be set from external code. Additionally all properties are required to be initialized.

dotnet fiddle example

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