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I have a general question. I've got a Julia programme that needs to use a random number each time it iterates through a for loop. I'm wondering is there any performance benefits to be gain if I make batches of random numbers before the loop and store them in an array calling these pre-made random numbers instead of generating them on the fly? And, if so, is there an optimum batch size?

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    Your question is rather broad and will depend on your specific application. Without more information, the only way you can tell is to measure your application's performance with and without batching. You should edit your question explaining more about your specific application. For example, is the application too slow for your purposes because of the random number generator? – Peter O. Nov 11 '20 at 10:20
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As Peter O. commented it depends. But let me give you an example where batching is desired:

julia> using Random, BenchmarkTools

julia> function f1()
           x = Vector{Float64}(undef, 10^6)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           for i in 1:100
               rand!(x)
               y .+= x
           end
           return y
       end
f1 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function f2()
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               @simd for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += rand()
               end
           end
           return y
       end
f2 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function f3()
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += rand()
               end
           end
           return y
       end
f3 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function f4()
           x = Vector{Float64}(undef, 10^6)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               rand!(x)
               @simd for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += x[j]
               end
           end
           return y
       end
f4 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function f5()
           x = Vector{Float64}(undef, 10^6)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               rand!(x)
               for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += x[j]
               end
           end
           return y
       end
f5 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> @btime f1();
  171.816 ms (4 allocations: 15.26 MiB)

julia> @btime f2();
  370.950 ms (2 allocations: 7.63 MiB)

julia> @btime f3();
  412.871 ms (2 allocations: 7.63 MiB)

julia> @btime f4();
  172.355 ms (4 allocations: 15.26 MiB)

julia> @btime f5();
  174.676 ms (4 allocations: 15.26 MiB)

As you can see f1 (and two variants using the loop f4 and f5) are much faster than when not using the cache for storing generated random variables (f2 and f3 functions). I have shown both variants using and not using @simd for comparison.

EDIT

The comment by rafak is very good. Here are the benchmarks. As you can see there is still some difference, but much lower (as the most cost is generation of random numbers and not addition).

julia> function g1(rnd)
           x = Vector{Float64}(undef, 10^6)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           for i in 1:100
               rand!(rnd, x)
               y .+= x
           end
           return y
       end
g1 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function g2(rnd)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               @simd for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += rand(rnd)
               end
           end
           return y
       end
g2 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> function g3(rnd)
           y = zeros(10^6)
           @inbounds for i in 1:100
               for j in 1:10^6
                   y[j] += rand(rnd)
               end
           end
           return y
       end
g3 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> using Random

julia> rnd = MersenneTwister();

julia> @btime g1($rnd);
  168.874 ms (4 allocations: 15.26 MiB)

julia> @btime g2($rnd);
  193.398 ms (2 allocations: 7.63 MiB)

julia> @btime g3($rnd);
  192.320 ms (2 allocations: 7.63 MiB)
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    I would like to stress out that using the global implicit RNG (the RNG that is used when calling e.g. rand()) is slow at call site. This means that calling rand(100000) is fine (retrieving the global RNG is amortized compared to random generation), but calling rand() in a loop has an overhead for each generated scalar. So it's recommended to use a named RNG, e.g. rng = MersenneTwister() before the loop, and then rand(rng). If you want to use the global one, on Julia 1.3+, you can use rng = Random.default_rng(). – rafak Nov 11 '20 at 14:23
  • This simple trick makes the non-batched versions of this benchmark faster on my machine. – rafak Nov 11 '20 at 14:25
  • An extremely good point. I have not thought about this. Still buffering with rand! I think is faster (as this is what my benchmarks show) as using rand(rng) seems to disable SIMD later. I will update the answer with a comparison. – Bogumił Kamiński Nov 11 '20 at 14:58
  • > "using rand(rng) seems to disable SIMD later." I'm not exactly sure what you mean, but as rand() is more involved than rand(rng), I would be surprised that SIMD is disabled only for the latter. BTW, for your initial benchmark, I get the same timing for f2 and f3 (so @simd didn't change anything for me). And it's interesting to see that on our two different machines, the best strategy doesn't end up being the same! (batched vs non-batched)... there is definitely no way around benchmarking on one's production machine :) – rafak Nov 11 '20 at 20:32
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    What I mean is that y .+= x uses SIMD and SIMD is disabled both for rand() and rand(rng). And yes - it is very interesting that we are getting different results. – Bogumił Kamiński Nov 11 '20 at 22:03

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