39

Is there a way to calculate a formula stored in a string in JavaScript without using eval?

Normally I would do something like

var apa = "12/5*9+9.4*2";
alert(eval(apa));

So, does anyone know about alternatives to eval?

  • 4
    There is nothing wrong with eval as long as you can be sure about what the string you are evaluating contains. – Felix Kling Jun 25 '11 at 17:05
  • 1
    I agree with Felix. Any other way wouldn't be as efficient. However, I have provided a pure JS solution (w/o eval). – vol7ron Jun 26 '11 at 8:00
  • 1
    In case you wondered, using eval in a web app is not a security risk. If someone wants to inject code into your web app, they can just open it up in the chrome debugger and modify the code! The only time you need to worry about security is if you are using eval() on the server, such as node.js – John Henckel Mar 9 at 15:52

10 Answers 10

10

This exactly the place where you should be using eval, or you will have to loop through the string and generate the numbers. You will have to use isNaN method to do it.

  • 1
    Only if the string comes from a trusted source. – Felix Kling Jun 25 '11 at 17:14
  • 1
    Of course, which seems to be the case in this example. – Troy SK Jun 25 '11 at 17:17
71

Mhh, you could use the Function-constructor:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function

function evil(fn) {
  return new Function('return ' + fn)();
}

console.log( evil('12/5*9+9.4*2') ); // => 40.4
  • 7
    You, sir, are awesome. I hadn't known about this until your post. +1 upvote from me, and I've already used it in a project. Goodbye eval()! – Michael Sep 10 '13 at 14:52
  • 1
    @ufucuk Thanks for your recognition, and greetings to FFM! :) – yckart Oct 21 '14 at 15:09
  • 5
    But keep in mind that using the Function constructor in this way is similar to eval() in that the risks may be comparable. In this case, because the string is assumed to be safe and trusted, we would expect use of either eval() or the Function constructor to be reasonable. – davisec52 Oct 22 '15 at 16:40
  • 2
    @davisec52 That's why I called it eviiil ;) – yckart Jan 19 '16 at 12:41
  • 2
    Chrome's Content Security Policy will still throw EvalError – alib_15 Apr 6 '16 at 22:16
37

There's nothing wrong with eval, especially for cases like this. You can sanitize the string with a regex first to be safe:

// strip anything other than digits, (), -+/* and .
var str = "12/5*9+9.4*2".replace(/[^-()\d/*+.]/g, '');
alert(eval(str));
  • Yes, I'll upvote this since it's exactly similar to what I was about to suggest.. – Robin Maben Jun 25 '11 at 17:37
20

Eval was built for conditions like this.

If you wanted another method, you'd have to use a pure Javascript implementation of the exact thing eval is going to do.

  • The hard part is not the parsing of numbers and operators
  • The hard part is applying order of operation and recursive control

Here's a quick basic example I came up with (updated (2011-06-26): cleaner w/ input boxes).
http://jsfiddle.net/vol7ron/6cdfA/

Note:

  • it only handles the basic operators
  • it does not check the validity of the numbers (example: divide by zero)
  • it has not implemented parenthetical operation
  • for all these reasons and more, eval would be a better choice

Edit (2017-05-26) to use SO Snippet:

function calculate(input) {

  var f = {
    add: '+',
    sub: '-',
    div: '/',
    mlt: '*',
    mod: '%',
    exp: '^'
  };

  // Create array for Order of Operation and precedence
  f.ooo = [
    [
      [f.mlt],
      [f.div],
      [f.mod],
      [f.exp]
    ],
    [
      [f.add],
      [f.sub]
    ]
  ];

  input = input.replace(/[^0-9%^*\/()\-+.]/g, ''); // clean up unnecessary characters

  var output;
  for (var i = 0, n = f.ooo.length; i < n; i++) {

    // Regular Expression to look for operators between floating numbers or integers
    var re = new RegExp('(\\d+\\.?\\d*)([\\' + f.ooo[i].join('\\') + '])(\\d+\\.?\\d*)');
    re.lastIndex = 0; // take precautions and reset re starting pos

    // Loop while there is still calculation for level of precedence
    while (re.test(input)) {
      output = _calculate(RegExp.$1, RegExp.$2, RegExp.$3);
      if (isNaN(output) || !isFinite(output)) 
        return output; // exit early if not a number
      input = input.replace(re, output);
    }
  }

  return output;

  function _calculate(a, op, b) {
    a = a * 1;
    b = b * 1;
    switch (op) {
      case f.add:
        return a + b;
        break;
      case f.sub:
        return a - b;
        break;
      case f.div:
        return a / b;
        break;
      case f.mlt:
        return a * b;
        break;
      case f.mod:
        return a % b;
        break;
      case f.exp:
        return Math.pow(a, b);
        break;
      default:
        null;
    }
  }
}
label {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 4em;
}
<div>
  <label for="input">Equation: </label>
  <input type="text" id="input" value="12/5*9+9.4*2-1" />
  <input type="button" 
         value="calculate" 
         onclick="getElementById('result').value = calculate(getElementById('input').value)" />
</div>

<div>
  <label for="result">Result: </label>
  <input type="text" id="result" />
</div>

  • 2
    +1 nice work in the fiddle :) – bevacqua Jun 26 '11 at 16:05
  • Cheers, Nico; just felt like fiddling :) Perhaps I should add in the parentheses – vol7ron Jun 26 '11 at 18:21
  • I would upvote twice if I could. – alib_15 Apr 6 '16 at 22:21
  • @alib_15 same here, elegant solution !! – Mazino S Ukah Sep 22 '18 at 16:41
10

Here is an implementation of the Shunting-yard algorithm with additional support for unary prefix (e.g. -) and postfix (e.g. !) operators, and function (e.g. sqrt()) notations. More operators/functions can be easily defined with the Calculation.defineOperator method:

"use strict";
class Calculation {
    constructor() {
        this._symbols = {};
        this.defineOperator("!", this.factorial,      "postfix", 6);
        this.defineOperator("^", Math.pow,            "infix",   5, true);
        this.defineOperator("*", this.multiplication, "infix",   4);
        this.defineOperator("/", this.division,       "infix",   4);
        this.defineOperator("+", this.last,           "prefix",  3);
        this.defineOperator("-", this.negation,       "prefix",  3);
        this.defineOperator("+", this.addition,       "infix",   2);
        this.defineOperator("-", this.subtraction,    "infix",   2);
        this.defineOperator(",", Array.of,            "infix",   1);
        this.defineOperator("(", this.last,           "prefix");
        this.defineOperator(")", null,                "postfix");
        this.defineOperator("min", Math.min);
        this.defineOperator("sqrt", Math.sqrt);
    }
    // Method allowing to extend an instance with more operators and functions:
    defineOperator(symbol, f, notation = "func", precedence = 0, rightToLeft = false) {
        // Store operators keyed by their symbol/name. Some symbols may represent
        // different usages: e.g. "-" can be unary or binary, so they are also
        // keyed by their notation (prefix, infix, postfix, func):
        if (notation === "func") precedence = 0;
        this._symbols[symbol] = Object.assign({}, this._symbols[symbol], {
            [notation]: {
                symbol, f, notation, precedence, rightToLeft, 
                argCount: 1 + (notation === "infix")
            },
            symbol,
            regSymbol: symbol.replace(/[\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&')
                + (/\w$/.test(symbol) ? "\\b" : "") // add a break if it's a name 
        });
    }
    last(...a)           { return a[a.length-1] }
    negation(a)          { return -a }
    addition(a, b)       { return a + b }
    subtraction(a, b)    { return a - b }
    multiplication(a, b) { return a * b }
    division(a, b)       { return a / b }
    factorial(a) {
        if (a%1 || !(+a>=0)) return NaN
        if (a > 170) return Infinity;
        let b = 1;
        while (a > 1) b *= a--;
        return b;
    }
    calculate(expression) {
        let match;
        const values = [],
            operators = [this._symbols["("].prefix],
            exec = _ => {
                let op = operators.pop();
                values.push(op.f(...[].concat(...values.splice(-op.argCount))));
                return op.precedence;
            },
            error = msg => {
                let notation = match ? match.index : expression.length;
                return `${msg} at ${notation}:\n${expression}\n${' '.repeat(notation)}^`;
            },
            pattern = new RegExp(
                // Pattern for numbers
                "\\d+(?:\\.\\d+)?|" 
                // ...and patterns for individual operators/function names
                + Object.values(this._symbols)
                        // longer symbols should be listed first
                        .sort( (a, b) => b.symbol.length - a.symbol.length ) 
                        .map( val => val.regSymbol ).join('|')
                + "|(\\S)", "g"
            );
        let afterValue = false;
        pattern.lastIndex = 0; // Reset regular expression object
        do {
            match = pattern.exec(expression);
            const [token, bad] = match || [")", undefined],
                notNumber = this._symbols[token],
                notNewValue = notNumber && !notNumber.prefix && !notNumber.func,
                notAfterValue = !notNumber || !notNumber.postfix && !notNumber.infix;
            // Check for syntax errors:
            if (bad || (afterValue ? notAfterValue : notNewValue)) return error("Syntax error");
            if (afterValue) {
                // We either have an infix or postfix operator (they should be mutually exclusive)
                const curr = notNumber.postfix || notNumber.infix;
                do {
                    const prev = operators[operators.length-1];
                    if (((curr.precedence - prev.precedence) || prev.rightToLeft) > 0) break; 
                    // Apply previous operator, since it has precedence over current one
                } while (exec()); // Exit loop after executing an opening parenthesis or function
                afterValue = curr.notation === "postfix";
                if (curr.symbol !== ")") {
                    operators.push(curr);
                    // Postfix always has precedence over any operator that follows after it
                    if (afterValue) exec();
                }
            } else if (notNumber) { // prefix operator or function
                operators.push(notNumber.prefix || notNumber.func);
                if (notNumber.func) { // Require an opening parenthesis
                    match = pattern.exec(expression);
                    if (!match || match[0] !== "(") return error("Function needs parentheses")
                }
            } else { // number
                values.push(+token);
                afterValue = true;
            }
        } while (match && operators.length);
        return operators.length ? error("Missing closing parenthesis")
                : match ? error("Too many closing parentheses")
                : values.pop() // All done!
    }
}
Calculation = new Calculation(); // Create a singleton

// I/O handling
function perform() {
    const expr = document.getElementById('expr').value,
        result = Calculation.calculate(expr);
    document.getElementById('out').textContent = isNaN(result) ? result : '=' + result;
}
document.getElementById('expr').addEventListener('input', perform);
perform();

// Tests
const tests = [
    { expr: '1+2', expected: 3 },
    { expr: '1+2*3', expected: 7 },
    { expr: '1+2*3^2', expected: 19 },
    { expr: '1+2*2^3^2', expected: 1025 },
    { expr: '-3!', expected: -6 },
    { expr: '12---11+1-3', expected: -1 },
    { expr: 'min(2,1,3)', expected: 1 },
    { expr: '(2,1,3)', expected: 3 },
    { expr: '4-min(sqrt(2+2*7),9,5)', expected: 0 },
    { expr: '2,3,10', expected: 10 }
]

for (let {expr, expected} of tests) {
    let result = Calculation.calculate(expr);
    console.assert(result === expected, `${expr} should be ${expected}, but gives ${result}`);
}
#expr { width: 100%; font-family: monospace }
Expression: <input id="expr" value="min(-1,0)+((sqrt(16)+(-4+7)!*---4)/2)^2^3"><p>
<pre id="out"></pre>

  • 1
    What a thing of beauty! – Eric Herlitz Dec 12 '17 at 7:38
8

If you don't want to use eval you will have to use an existing expression evaluator library.

http://silentmatt.com/javascript-expression-evaluator/

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/scripting/jsexpressioneval.aspx

You can also roll one of your own :)

2

You can't, at most you could do something retort like parsing the numbers and then separating the operations with a switch, and making them. Other than that, I'd use eval in this case.

That would be something like (a real implementation will be somewhat more complex, specially if you consider the use of parenthesis, but you get the idea)

    function operate(text) {
        var values = text.split("+");

        return parseInt(values[0]) + parseInt(values[1]);
    }

    alert(operate("9+2"));

Still I think the best choice you can make is to use eval, given that you're able to trust the source of the string.

2

I spent a couple of hours to implement all the arithmetical rules without using eval() and finally I published a package on npm string-math. Everything is in the description. Enjoy

2

If you're looking for a syntactical equivalent to eval, you could use new Function. There are slight differences regarding scoping, but they mostly behave the same, including exposure to much of the same security risks:

let str = "12/5*9+9.4*2"

let res1 = eval(str)
console.log('res1:', res1)

let res2 = (new Function('return '+str)())
console.log('res2:', res2)

1

This solution also clips whitespaces and checks for duplicating operators

e.g. ' 1+ 2 *2' // 5 but ' 1 + +2* 2 ' // Error

function calcMe(str) {
  const noWsStr = str.replace(/\s/g, '');
  const operators = noWsStr.replace(/[\d.,]/g, '').split('');
  const operands = noWsStr.replace(/[+/%*-]/g, ' ')
                          .replace(/\,/g, '.')
                          .split(' ')
                          .map(parseFloat)
                          .filter(it => it);

  if (operators.length >= operands.length){
    throw new Error('Operators qty must be lesser than operands qty')
  };

  while (operators.includes('*')) {
    let opIndex = operators.indexOf('*');
    operands.splice(opIndex, 2, operands[opIndex] * operands[opIndex + 1]);
    operators.splice(opIndex, 1);
  };
  while (operators.includes('/')) {
    let opIndex = operators.indexOf('/');
    operands.splice(opIndex, 2, operands[opIndex] / operands[opIndex + 1]);
    operators.splice(opIndex, 1);
  };
  while (operators.includes('%')) {
    let opIndex = operators.indexOf('%');
    operands.splice(opIndex, 2, operands[opIndex] % operands[opIndex + 1]);
    operators.splice(opIndex, 1);
  };

  let result = operands[0];
  for (let i = 0; i < operators.length; i++) {
    operators[i] === '+' ? (result += operands[i + 1]) : (result -= operands[i + 1])
  }
  return result
}

This shows to be more performant than @vol7ron's solution. Check this JSBenchmark

  • Braces are not supported, am I right? Anyway, truly bold attempt! – Alex Yu Feb 2 at 14:00
  • True. Totally forgot about the braces, thx – nikkypizza Feb 2 at 14:04
  • OP did not mention braces so I think your answer is OK – Alex Yu Feb 2 at 14:09

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