195

In Python, what is the best way to compute the difference between two lists?

example

A = [1,2,3,4]
B = [2,5]

A - B = [1,3,4]
B - A = [5]

13 Answers 13

206
1

Use set if you don't care about items order or repetition. Use list comprehensions if you do:

>>> def diff(first, second):
        second = set(second)
        return [item for item in first if item not in second]

>>> diff(A, B)
[1, 3, 4]
>>> diff(B, A)
[5]
>>> 
| improve this answer | |
  • 32
    Consider using set(b) to ensure the algorithm is O(nlogn) instead of Theta(n^2) – Neil G Jun 27 '11 at 8:47
  • 8
    @Pencilcheck - not if you care about ordering or duplication in A. Applying set to B is harmless, but applying it to A and using the result instead of the original A is not. – Mark Reed Aug 31 '14 at 19:09
  • 1
    @NeilG Do you consider time consumed to build the set? In my case (both lists have about 10M strings) time to build two sets and subtract them is considerably larger than building one set and iterating over the list. – dimril Jan 19 '18 at 8:19
  • @dimril if that's what you want to do maybe you should implement something more sophisticated. You could for example sort both lists O(n log n + m log m) and then iterate over the second list but use binary search to find the items in the first list. It would come out to O(n log n + m log m + m log n) operations (instead of O(n*m) operations), which doesn't seem too bad. Just make sure to check for neighbors to also eliminate duplicates in your binary search implementations. There might even be a package that already implements this, but I didn't check. – jaaq Feb 25 '19 at 9:49
366
0

If the order does not matter, you can simply calculate the set difference:

>>> set([1,2,3,4]) - set([2,5])
set([1, 4, 3])
>>> set([2,5]) - set([1,2,3,4])
set([5])
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    This is by far the best solution. Test case on lists with ~6000 strings each showed that this method was almost 100x faster than list comprehensions. – perrygeo Feb 1 '14 at 17:01
  • 15
    Depends on application: if order or duplication preservation is important Roman Bodnarchuk may have a better approach. For speed and pure set-like behavior this one seems better. – Bryan P Feb 13 '15 at 23:01
  • 7
    If you have multiple equal elements in list this solution won't work. – karantan Sep 15 '16 at 13:02
  • Far more better than list comprehension. – Dawei Mar 13 '18 at 9:09
  • 4
    This solution seems so obvious but it's incorrect. I'm sorry. Of course we mean that a list can have repeated equal elements. Otherwise we ask about the difference between sets, not about list difference. – sergzach Jun 1 '18 at 10:20
67
0

You can do a

list(set(A)-set(B))

and

list(set(B)-set(A))
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    But if A = [1,1,1] and B = [0] then this returns [1] – Mark Bell Feb 6 '17 at 19:14
  • 1
    @Mark Bell: Thats because a set is a distinct list. (removes duplicates) – cloudy May 1 '17 at 14:44
  • 1
    @cloudy Then this doesn't answer the question. – samm82 Dec 23 '19 at 5:27
  • @samm82 if A=[1,1,1] than set(A) is [1] because set is a distinct list and removes duplicates. Thats why, if A = [1,1,1] and B = [0] it returns [1]. – cloudy May 25 at 11:57
29
0

One liner:

diff = lambda l1,l2: [x for x in l1 if x not in l2]
diff(A,B)
diff(B,A)

Or:

diff = lambda l1,l2: filter(lambda x: x not in l2, l1)
diff(A,B)
diff(B,A)
| improve this answer | |
14
0

The above examples trivialized the problem of calculating differences. Assuming sorting or de-duplication definitely make it easier to compute the difference, but if your comparison cannot afford those assumptions then you'll need a non-trivial implementation of a diff algorithm. See difflib in the python standard library.

from difflib import SequenceMatcher 

squeeze=SequenceMatcher( None, A, B )

print "A - B = [%s]"%( reduce( lambda p,q: p+q, 
                               map( lambda t: squeeze.a[t[1]:t[2]], 
                                    filter(lambda x:x[0]!='equal', 
                                           squeeze.get_opcodes() ) ) ) )

A - B = [[1, 3, 4]]

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    you get +1 for difflib, which I hadn't seen before. nevertheless, I don't agree that the above answers trivialize the problem as stated. – rbp Jun 25 '13 at 21:12
  • Thanks for using difflib - I was looking for a solution using the standard library. However, this is not working in Python 3, as print has changed from a command to a function, and reduce, filter and map have been declared unpythonic. (And I think Guido may be right - I don't understand what reduce does, either.) – Post169 Jun 20 '18 at 16:05
  • Not a big shift to make it work for py3. I've read the debate over filter, map, reduce and agree with the choice to push reduce and and alternate impl of filter into functools. The mixed functional, OO and procedural nature of python has always been, IMO, one of its strengths. – Kevin Jun 20 '18 at 17:43
14
0

Python 2.7.3 (default, Feb 27 2014, 19:58:35) - IPython 1.1.0 - timeit: (github gist)

def diff(a, b):
  b = set(b)
  return [aa for aa in a if aa not in b]

def set_diff(a, b):
  return list(set(a) - set(b))

diff_lamb_hension = lambda l1,l2: [x for x in l1 if x not in l2]

diff_lamb_filter = lambda l1,l2: filter(lambda x: x not in l2, l1)

from difflib import SequenceMatcher
def squeezer(a, b):
  squeeze = SequenceMatcher(None, a, b)
  return reduce(lambda p,q: p+q, map(
    lambda t: squeeze.a[t[1]:t[2]],
      filter(lambda x:x[0]!='equal',
        squeeze.get_opcodes())))

Results:

# Small
a = range(10)
b = range(10/2)

timeit[diff(a, b)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 1.97 µs per loop

timeit[set_diff(a, b)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.71 µs per loop

timeit[diff_lamb_hension(a, b)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.1 µs per loop

timeit[diff_lamb_filter(a, b)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.58 µs per loop

timeit[squeezer(a, b)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 36 µs per loop

# Medium
a = range(10**4)
b = range(10**4/2)

timeit[diff(a, b)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.17 ms per loop

timeit[set_diff(a, b)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.27 ms per loop

timeit[diff_lamb_hension(a, b)]
1 loops, best of 3: 736 ms per loop

timeit[diff_lamb_filter(a, b)]
1 loops, best of 3: 732 ms per loop

timeit[squeezer(a, b)]
100 loops, best of 3: 12.8 ms per loop

# Big
a = xrange(10**7)
b = xrange(10**7/2)

timeit[diff(a, b)]
1 loops, best of 3: 1.74 s per loop

timeit[set_diff(a, b)]
1 loops, best of 3: 2.57 s per loop

timeit[diff_lamb_filter(a, b)]
# too long to wait for

timeit[diff_lamb_filter(a, b)]
# too long to wait for

timeit[diff_lamb_filter(a, b)]
# TypeError: sequence index must be integer, not 'slice'

@roman-bodnarchuk list comprehensions function def diff(a, b) seems to be faster.

| improve this answer | |
9
0
A = [1,2,3,4]
B = [2,5]

#A - B
x = list(set(A) - set(B))
#B - A 
y = list(set(B) - set(A))

print x
print y 
| improve this answer | |
8
0

You would want to use a set instead of a list.

| improve this answer | |
5
0

In case you want the difference recursively going deep into items of your list, I have written a package for python: https://github.com/erasmose/deepdiff

Installation

Install from PyPi:

pip install deepdiff

If you are Python3 you need to also install:

pip install future six

Example usage

>>> from deepdiff import DeepDiff
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> from __future__ import print_function

Same object returns empty

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = t1
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> print (ddiff.changes)
    {}

Type of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:"2", 3:3}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> print (ddiff.changes)
    {'type_changes': ["root[2]: 2=<type 'int'> vs. 2=<type 'str'>"]}

Value of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> print (ddiff.changes)
    {'values_changed': ['root[2]: 2 ====>> 4']}

Item added and/or removed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:4}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 5:5, 6:6}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes)
    {'dic_item_added': ['root[5, 6]'],
     'dic_item_removed': ['root[4]'],
     'values_changed': ['root[2]: 2 ====>> 4']}

String difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { 'values_changed': [ 'root[2]: 2 ====>> 4',
                          "root[4]['b']:\n--- \n+++ \n@@ -1 +1 @@\n-world\n+world!"]}
>>>
>>> print (ddiff.changes['values_changed'][1])
    root[4]['b']:
    --- 
    +++ 
    @@ -1 +1 @@
    -world
    +world!

String difference 2

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!\nGoodbye!\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { 'values_changed': [ "root[4]['b']:\n--- \n+++ \n@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@\n-world!\n-Goodbye!\n+world\n 1\n 2\n End"]}
>>>
>>> print (ddiff.changes['values_changed'][0])
    root[4]['b']:
    --- 
    +++ 
    @@ -1,5 +1,4 @@
    -world!
    -Goodbye!
    +world
     1
     2
     End

Type change

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n\n\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { 'type_changes': [ "root[4]['b']: [1, 2, 3]=<type 'list'> vs. world\n\n\nEnd=<type 'str'>"]}

List difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { 'list_removed': ["root[4]['b']: [3]"]}

List difference 2: Note that it DOES NOT take order into account

>>> # Note that it DOES NOT take order into account
... t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 3, 2]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { }

List that contains dictionary:

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:1, 2:2}]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:3}]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff.changes, indent = 2)
    { 'dic_item_removed': ["root[4]['b'][2][2]"],
      'values_changed': ["root[4]['b'][2][1]: 1 ====>> 3"]}
| improve this answer | |
5
0

most simple way,

use set().difference(set())

list_a = [1,2,3]
list_b = [2,3]
print set(list_a).difference(set(list_b))

answer is set([1])

| improve this answer | |
2
0

In case of a list of dictionaries, the full list comprehension solution works while the set solution raises

TypeError: unhashable type: 'dict'

Test Case

def diff(a, b):
    return [aa for aa in a if aa not in b]

d1 = {"a":1, "b":1}
d2 = {"a":2, "b":2}
d3 = {"a":3, "b":3}

>>> diff([d1, d2, d3], [d2, d3])
[{'a': 1, 'b': 1}]
>>> diff([d1, d2, d3], [d1])
[{'a': 2, 'b': 2}, {'a': 3, 'b': 3}]
| improve this answer | |
0
0

Simple code that gives you the difference with multiple items if you want that:

a=[1,2,3,3,4]
b=[2,4]
tmp = copy.deepcopy(a)
for k in b:
    if k in tmp:
        tmp.remove(k)
print(tmp)
| improve this answer | |
-1
0

When having a look at TimeComplexity of In-operator, in worst case it works with O(n). Even for Sets.

So when comparing two arrays we'll have a TimeComplexity of O(n) in best case and O(n^2) in worst case.

An alternative (but unfortunately more complex) solution, which works with O(n) in best and worst case is this one:

# Compares the difference of list a and b
# uses a callback function to compare items
def diff(a, b, callback):
  a_missing_in_b = []
  ai = 0
  bi = 0

  a = sorted(a, callback)
  b = sorted(b, callback)

  while (ai < len(a)) and (bi < len(b)):

    cmp = callback(a[ai], b[bi])
    if cmp < 0:
      a_missing_in_b.append(a[ai])
      ai += 1
    elif cmp > 0:
      # Item b is missing in a
      bi += 1
    else:
      # a and b intersecting on this item
      ai += 1
      bi += 1

  # if a and b are not of same length, we need to add the remaining items
  for ai in xrange(ai, len(a)):
    a_missing_in_b.append(a[ai])


  return a_missing_in_b

e.g.

>>> a=[1,2,3]
>>> b=[2,4,6]
>>> diff(a, b, cmp)
[1, 3]
| improve this answer | |

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