11

Let's say I'm using Java 11 javac, but I'm using the --source and --target options set to 1.8 so that my source code will be considered Java 8 and the output .class files will be compatible with Java 8. My goal is to produce .class files that can run on a Java 8 JVM.

And let's say I have the following Java 8 code I'm compiling:

import java.nio.ByteBuffer;

…

ByteBuffer byteBuffer = …; //init somehow
byteBuffer.flip(); //what ends up in the `.class` file?

The question is: what should Java 11 javac put in the .class file to link the byteBuffer.flip() method call? Before you answer, consider this:

  • Neither Java 8 ByteBuffer nor Java 11 ByteBuffer declare the flip() method at the ByteBuffer level.
  • ByteBuffer is a direct subclass of Buffer. There is both a Java 8 Buffer.flip() and a Java 11 Buffer.flip() declared in the Buffer API for both versions.
  • In the Java 8 source code, there is no ByteBuffer.flip() method.
  • But in the Java 11 source code, ByteBuffer overrides the Buffer.flip() method like the following. The purpose apparently was to use covariance so that in Java 11 ByteBuffer.flip() would conveniently return a ByteBuffer instead of a Buffer.
    @Override
    public ByteBuffer flip() {
        super.flip();
        return this;
    }
    

So to restate the question: Should Java 11 javac, with the --source and --target options set to 1.8, generate a .class file that links to Buffer.flip() or to ByteBuffer.flip()? If it is the former, then how does it know not to include ByteBuffer.flip() instead, as the (Java 8) code clearly references ByteBuffer.flip() and the (Java 11) compiler sees that there is a ByteBuffer.flip() method in the runtime? But if it is the latter, then how can I ever know that my 100% correct Java 8 compatible source code, when compiled using Java 11, will run on a Java 8 JRE even if I use the --source and --target options to indicate Java 8? (Note that OpenJDK 11.0.5 seems to choose the latter option. But which is correct?)

(Note that I'm using the word "link" loosely; I'm not currently well-versed in what bytecode is generated. All I know is that the class file has come reference somehow to Buffer.flip() or ByteBuffer.flip(); and if this method can't be found at runtime, the JVM will throw an exception such as: java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: java.nio.ByteBuffer.flip()Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;.)

As a bonus question, I wonder whether using the --release option set for Java 8 would change the answer. But note that I can't use the --release option (equivalent to the Maven <release> compiler plugin option) because I want my Maven project to be buildable with both Java 8 and Java 11.

3
  • You keep saying "link" but talking about things that aren't linking. It'll use invokevirtual and the standard rules apply. Nov 17, 2020 at 3:49
  • Thanks for pointing out the terminology. I'm using "link" loosely, because I don't know what goes in the .class file. But it must reference the method somehow. Does it reference the method in terms of Buffer or ByteBuffer? I clarified the question a bit. When I see an error message such as java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: java.nio.ByteBuffer.flip()Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;, does that mean the .class file contained an explicit reference to ByteBuffer.flip()? Or did the .class file contain some sort of more general reference, and the JRE merely inferred ByteBuffer.flip()? Nov 17, 2020 at 4:47
  • 1
    Just a small addition. There is a small library that was created for this kind of problems with ByteBuffer on Java 9+. Nov 19, 2020 at 5:44

1 Answer 1

16
+50

If we take the following code and compile with Java 8 and with Java 11, we get the following bytecode, as seen when running javap -c MyClass.class.

Java Source code

ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(64);
byteBuffer.flip();

Java 8 bytecode

 0: bipush        64
 2: invokestatic  #19   // Method java/nio/ByteBuffer.allocate:(I)Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;
 5: astore_1
 6: aload_1
 7: invokevirtual #25   // Method java/nio/ByteBuffer.flip:()Ljava/nio/Buffer;
10: pop

Java 11 bytecode

 0: bipush        64
 2: invokestatic  #19   // Method java/nio/ByteBuffer.allocate:(I)Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;
 5: astore_1
 6: aload_1
 7: invokevirtual #25   // Method java/nio/ByteBuffer.flip:()Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;
10: pop

As you can see, both of them "link" to the flip() method of ByteBuffer, even though the method isn't declared there for Java 8.

However, at the bytecode level, method signatures include the return type. This means that the JVM supports languages where you can overload methods that differ only in return type, even though Java doesn't support that.

The Java 11 version of the method has a different return type, which can be seen in the "linked" method, following the (), where Java 8 shows return type as Ljava/nio/Buffer; and Java 11 shows return type as Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;.

When you take the code that was compiled against the Java 11 Runtime Library, and you try running it on Java 8, you get Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: java.nio.ByteBuffer.flip()Ljava/nio/ByteBuffer;

This is why you should always specify the bootstrap class path to point to a Java Runtime Library matching the target Java version. When you compile using Java 11's javac with options -source 8 -target 8, it will actually warn you about that:

warning: [options] bootstrap class path not set in conjunction with -source 8
1 warning

This is why they implemented the newer --release <release> option to replace -source and -target. If you compile with --release 8, the generated .class file will run without error on Java 8.


UPDATE

You don't need Java 8 installed to use option --release 8. The Java 11 installation knows what the methods of the Java 8 Runtime Library were.

The --release option was implemented in Java 9 as a result of JEP 247: Compile for Older Platform Versions, which says:

For JDK N and --release M, M < N, signature data of the documented APIs of release M of the platform is needed. This data is stored in the $JDK_ROOT/lib/ct.sym file, which is similar, but not the same, as the file of the same name in JDK 8. The ct.sym file is a ZIP file containing stripped-down class files corresponding to class files from the target platform versions.

13
  • This is all very interesting, thank you. In my actual use case I'm using Maven. I wonder how I would set the "bootstrap class path" in Maven? I've never seen the warning you mention. Perhaps I should throw in the towel and use the Maven compiler plugin <release> option, i.e. the --release javac option, which would require the project to be built with Java 11 but the artifacts would be compatible with Java 8. So you're saying in this case --release would cause this to "link" to Buffer.flip()? But how is that, if the bytecode is the same (as it seems to be in your example above)? Nov 17, 2020 at 4:56
  • Huh. Did not know about the variant-return business. Nov 17, 2020 at 4:58
  • 1
    @GarretWilson The bytecode is not the same, because Java 8 links to Buffer ByteBuffer.flip() and Java 11 links to ByteBuffer ByteBuffer.flip(), i.e. both link to ByteBuffer.flip() but with different return types. There is no link to Buffer.flip() in the bytecode of either version.
    – Andreas
    Nov 17, 2020 at 4:59
  • 2
    @GarretWilson #19 and #25 are references to entries in the "constants" table of the .class file. In the class file, they are basically those strings you see commented after the constant number. The JVM then resolves those strings (method signatures) against actual methods when the class is loaded.
    – Andreas
    Nov 17, 2020 at 5:07
  • 1
    @GarretWilson It does. The --release option was implemented as a result of JEP 247: Compile for Older Platform Versions, which says: "For JDK N and --release M, M < N, signature data of the documented APIs of release M of the platform is needed. This data is stored in the $JDK_ROOT/lib/ct.sym file, which is similar, but not the same, as the file of the same name in JDK 8. The ct.sym file is a ZIP file containing stripped-down class files corresponding to class files from the target platform versions."
    – Andreas
    Nov 17, 2020 at 5:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.