5

Here is a minimum example of my problem:

import concurrent.futures
from functools import partial

# Object class
class obj:
    def __init__(self,tup):
        self.tup = tup

# Function includes attributes in objects of class above
def new(fi,fdic):
    fdic[fi].new = 'work_'+ str(fdic[fi].tup)
    
# Dictionary full of instances of obj above    
dic = {'a':obj(1),
       'b':obj(2),
       'c':obj(3),
       'd':obj(4),
       'e':obj(5),
       'f':obj(6),
      }

partial_new = partial(new, fdic=dic)

Now I want to multiprocess all the objects in the dictionary (because I have too many in reality). The code below runs. But it does not "work", because I actually need ProcessPool (I think? Because I want to process things in parallel).

with concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for _ in executor.map(partial_new, dic.keys()):
        pass
print(dic['b'].new)

This one does not run:

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for _ in executor.map(partial_new, dic.keys()):
        pass
print(dic['b'].new)

My question is: How do I make this work?

I just need to use the function to modify all the objects inside the dictionary in parallel. Later I wills save the full dictionary, but the function that I apply does not return anything (if this makes things easier).

4
  • 1
    You will not get it to work in a process pool. In a process pool, each process has its own copy of the dictionary, and each process will be modifying only its copy. Modifying a shared data structure is not something you use multiprocessing for. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 14:33
  • 1
    . . . You can use multiprocessing to build the various pieces of your data structure. You can call a process to say "what should I set my_dict[a] to be. But then your main process will have to do the actual assignment. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 14:34
  • @FrankYellin - While I have no experiance using them couldn't multiprocessing.shared_memory and/or Shared ctypes Objects be used?
    – wwii
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 15:12
  • Shared ctypes have simple values and arrays. Nothing as complicated as dictionaries. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

0

Is the issue that it takes a long time to calculate the new value?

def get_new_value(dictionary_item):
    key, value = dictionary_item
    return key, 'work_' + str(value.tup)

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for key, new_value in executor.map(get_new_value, dic.items()):
        dic[key].new = new_value

You can only have one thread modifying dic. But you can pass key and value to a thread, have the thread return the key and the new value, and then have the original thread do the work of updating the dictionary.

You'll probably want to specify a chunksize to map

=== edited ===

As promised, my complete file.

import concurrent.futures

# Object class
class obj:
    def __init__(self, tup):
        self.tup = tup


# Dictionary full of instances of obj above
dic = {'a': obj(1),
       'b': obj(2),
       'c': obj(3),
       'd': obj(4),
       'e': obj(5),
       'f': obj(6),
       }


def get_new_value(dictionary_item):
    key, value = dictionary_item
    return key, 'work_' + str(value.tup)

def go():
  with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
    for key, new_value in executor.map(get_new_value, dic.items()):
        dic[key].new = new_value
  # Make sure it really worked!
  for key, value in dic.items():
      print(key, value.new)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    go()
7
  • Your solution seems to have the same problem as mine: If I change ProcessPool to ThreadPool it works. But as it is, it gives me an error... Yes, my original problem is that each iteration inside the loop takes 20 min. and I need 350 of them.
    – Thiago
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 17:59
  • Oh. That problem. Your call to with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor(): cannot be top-level. It has to be inside a function. You then call that function inside if __name__ == '__main__': at the bottom. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 18:45
  • First, I forgot: Thanks for the help! Second, I am not sure if I understand... I am using a Jupyter notebook, but if I write if __name__ == '__main__': before calling with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor(): I still get the same error... I guess I am doing something wrong?
    – Thiago
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 21:15
  • Sorry. I don't know about Jupyter notebooks. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 21:18
  • No problem. Thanks anyway. But just for info (maybe someone else can help me, too), I get the same error if I run it on my normal Python console (not on Jupyter)...
    – Thiago
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 21:29
0

You can use ThreadPool from the multiprocess module in the following way:

  1. Create a list of the dict keys (ls = [a for a in dict.keys())
  2. Define a function that given a pointer to a dict and a key does the alteration you desire
  3. use ThreadPool's starmap() method to run that function on the list you created and the dict
  4. join and close the thread pool
2
  • Isn't this equivalent to the parallel threads that I already have running?
    – Thiago
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 14:42
  • Not exactly,starmap() and ThreadPool apply the function in a different manner than what you wrote.
    – Tamir
    Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 14:44

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