3

I saw this function in some code and I can't find documentation on google about it. Can someone explain what it does and are there any alternatives to this ?

Thanks.

3

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/tsbaswba%28VS.80%29.aspx: it is a generic name for sscanf_s.

EDIT: which is conveniently documented here. _stscanf_s is in TCHAR.H on Windows platforms. You can probably get away with using sscanf_s or swscanf_s.

  • Oh I see, thanks for your answer. – Adrian Jun 27 '11 at 7:35
2

I'm assuming that the original question was about the difference between the safe and an older unsafe version of this function. I was looking for the same difference myself, and here's what it boils down to: _stscanf_s is different from _stscanf in the way it treats %s and %c specifiers. The *_s function will expect the sizes of their buffers to be passed in the next parameter, as the number of TCHARs.

The best way to illustrate it is with these code samples:

    const TCHAR* pSrcBuff = L"Date: 2015-12-25";

    TCHAR buffDate[6] = {0};
    TCHAR chDash1 = 0, chDash2 = 0;
    int year = 0, month = 0, day = 0;

    //Old "unsafe" method -- DON'T USE IT!
    int count_found = _stscanf(pSrcBuff, 
        L"%s%d%c%d%c%d", 
        &buffDate,
        &year,
        &chDash1,
        &month,
        &chDash2,
        &day
        );

    if(count_found == 6)    //Number of specifiers read
    {
        //Success
        ASSERT(lstrcmp(buffDate, L"Date:") == 0);
        ASSERT(year == 2015);
        ASSERT(chDash1 == L'-');
        ASSERT(month == 12);
        ASSERT(chDash2 == L'-');
        ASSERT(day = 25);
    }

Note that if I change buffDate[6] to 5 or lower, it will result in a stack corruption, which can be exploited by "bad guys."

That is why Microsoft created a new "safer" method, that goes as such:

    const TCHAR* pSrcBuff = L"Date: 2015-12-25";

    TCHAR buffDate[6] = {0};
    TCHAR chDash1 = 0, chDash2 = 0;
    int year = 0, month = 0, day = 0;

    //"Safe" version of the method
    int count_found = _stscanf_s(pSrcBuff, 
        L"%s%d%c%d%c%d", 
        &buffDate, sizeof(buffDate) / sizeof(buffDate[0]),
        &year,
        &chDash1, sizeof(chDash1),
        &month,
        &chDash2, sizeof(chDash2),
        &day
        );

    if(count_found == 6)    //Number of specifiers read
    {
        //Success
        ASSERT(lstrcmp(buffDate, L"Date:") == 0);
        ASSERT(year == 2015);
        ASSERT(chDash1 == L'-');
        ASSERT(month == 12);
        ASSERT(chDash2 == L'-');
        ASSERT(day = 25);
    }

In this case, if you set buffDate[6] to 5 or lower, the _stscanf_s function will simply fail, without overwriting the end of the buffDate buffer.

Note that scanf group of functions is still dangerous (in my view) and will throw memory/page-fault exceptions if you mistake %d with %s, or if you don't match them with correct parameters.

1

This MSDN article shows the _stscanf_s variant of their "secure" sscanf replacements:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t6z7bya3(v=vs.80).aspx

It is a TCHAR variant, which means that it should be able to support ANSI characters, and Unicode/Multi-byte, depending on how the app is compiled.

You could (somewhat) replace it with sscanf on a more generic C/C++ implementation.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.