-1

In the following code, I have to compare two strings, but I have to keep the Index of the original array. Is there a way to do that?

CODE :

        private dataStruct[] compare(string[] older, string[] new_str)
        {
            List <dataStruct> diff = new List<dataStruct>();

            foreach (var str in older.Except(new_str))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(str);
            }
            return diff.ToArray();
        }

Actual output : line 1 line 3...

Expected output : [1]=>line 1 [3]=>line 3...

Thanks!

  • 1
    What do you mean by "keep the index"? What is the diff? Show some example input and expected output, read How to Ask, provide a minimal reproducible example. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '20 at 21:02
  • Probably can't use a foreach in that case. – LarsTech Nov 18 '20 at 21:06
  • I am using it as a test (just to print the output), at the end, it won't be that – JPLEMARABOUT Nov 18 '20 at 21:09
-2

A foreach desn't keep track of the index, that's what for loops are for.

I'd imagine it will result in something like this:

private static dataStruct[] compare(string[] older, string[] new_str)
{
     int length = older.Length > new_str.Length ? older.Length : new_str.Length;

     List<dataStruct> diff = new List<dataStruct>();

     for (int index = 1; index <= length; index++)
     {
         string oldItem = index < older.Length ? older[index].oldItem : "N/A";
         string newItem = index < new_str.Length ? new_str[index].oldItem : "N/A";
                
         if (oldItem != newItem)
         {
             Console.WriteLine(string.Format("ID = [{0}]\t=>\t Old : {1}\t new : {2}", index, oldItem,newItem));
             diff.Add(new dataStruct(index, oldItem, newItem));
         }
     }

     return diff.ToArray();
}

struct dataStruct
{
    public int index { get; }
    public string oldItem { get; }
    public string newItem { get; }

    public dataStruct(int index, string oldItem, string newItem)
    {
        this.index = index;
        this.oldItem = oldItem;
        this.newItem = newItem;
    }
}
  • 1
    This doesn't output what the OP asked for. As a matter of fact it doesn't even have the same semantics as the OP's original code. I don't know why the OP accepted this answer. – Enigmativity Nov 18 '20 at 22:45
  • Your'e totally right @Enigmativity, that is not exactly the OPs original code semantcs. Apologies for that. But it's likely the intended behavior looking at he untouched List<dataStruct> for return. Nice solution by the way. – DerSchnitz Nov 19 '20 at 1:21
1

This does it nicely:

foreach ((var str, var n) in older.Select((x, n)=> (x, n)).Where(z => !new_str.Contains(z.x)))
{
    Console.WriteLine($"[{n + 1}]=>{str}");
}

When I test with this code:

compare(new [] { "A", "B", "D", "C", "E" }, new [] { "B", "C", "E" });

I get:

[1]=>A
[3]=>D

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.