3

I am writing a function that runs through a list of parameters looking for elements. If found, the function strips the name and returns the value, and if not there, a default. The values will be either a number or string. I would like a way to use the typescript generics, and the constraints to get the following to compile.

function GetValue<T extends number | string>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): T {
    if (datum.startsWith(element)) {
        if (typeof defaultValue === 'number')
            return parseInt(datum.substring(element.length)); // error
        else if (typeof defaultValue === 'string')
            return datum.substring(element.length); // error
    }
    return defaultValue;
}

I've excluded any error checking code, e.g. from the parseInt. This would be called as;

console.log(GetValue("abc123", "abc", 456));
console.log(GetValue("abc123", "def", 456));

And expect to get out 123 and 456.

Currently, it fails on the lines // error since the function could be called with a type that is extends a string or number but is not a string or number.

How do I constrain the generic T such that it is limited to be either a string or number (and not the union string | number) and the return type is then matched to the type of the defaultValue?

  • What types do you plan to pass that extend a number or a string? I don't get it. – Anatoly Nov 18 '20 at 22:09
  • None, only string and number, the compiler just recognises that it could be called with such a type and gives an error; ts(2322) – Niall Nov 18 '20 at 22:12
  • So why don't you do for instance GetValue(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: number | string): number | string? – Anatoly Nov 18 '20 at 22:14
  • The resultant type in const V = GetValue("abc", "a", "DEF") would be string | number, I would want it to be just a string or number – Niall Nov 18 '20 at 22:16
  • This function isn't safe... TS says GetValue<123>("a", "a", 123) returns 123, but it does not. – Gerrit0 Nov 19 '20 at 3:55
2

Cast explicit to T, to remove this error

function GetValue<T extends number | string>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): T {
    if (datum.startsWith(element)) {
        if (typeof defaultValue === 'number')
            return parseInt(datum.substring(element.length)) as T;
        else if (typeof defaultValue === 'string')
            return datum.substring(element.length) as T;
    }
    return defaultValue;
}

There is an issue open on github which discusses this topic.

  • So, it looks like there is no way to explicitly limit the generic to one of two (or a few) types, other that to say it satisfies the requirements of the type. The cast works, so I'll keep going with that for now. – Niall Nov 18 '20 at 22:34
  • What do you mean with 'no way to limit the generic'? Inside the T constraint you specified that it can be only a number or string with the union number | string. – Martin Godzina Nov 18 '20 at 22:37
  • Ok, I think see the origin of the bug/design limitation. It can't see that the "base" would need to be a primitive, it only sees the "extend", hence asserts a derived type could be used. – Niall Nov 18 '20 at 22:47
0

Please take a look at other approach:

interface Overloading {
  <T extends number>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): number;
  <T extends string>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): string;
}

const GetValue: Overloading = <T extends number | string>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T) => {
  if (datum.startsWith(element)) {
    if (typeof defaultValue === 'number')
      return parseInt(datum.substring(element.length));
    else if (typeof defaultValue === 'string')
      return datum.substring(element.length);
  }
  return defaultValue;
}



const res = GetValue('12', 'sdf', 2) // number
const res = GetValue('12', 'sdf', 'sdf') // string
const res = GetValue('12', 'sdf', ()=>{}) // error

Sometimes it is better to not define explicitly return type of function. Let TS do it for you.

I have used this function overloading for constraints.

UPDATE

TS docs: function overloads

//Let's say you have an enum:

const enum State {
  idle = 'idle',
  active = 'active',
  disable = 'disable'
}
//And you have a function:
// function handleState(state: State, payload: string | number | number[]): void;

// But you have next constraints:
// If state is `active`, payload should be only string
// If state is `idle`, payload should be number
// If state is `disable`, payload shoul be array of numbers number[]
// So let's update our handleState function
function handleState(state: State.active, payload: string): void;
function handleState(state: State.idle, payload: number): void;
function handleState(state: State.disable, payload: number[]): void;
function handleState(state: State, payload: string | number | number[]) {}

handleState(State.active, 2) // Error, active state can't be along with number payload
handleState(State.active, '2') // Ok, active state can be along with string payload

To make overloads for arrow functions, please consider interfaces, just like in my first example.

You can add to overloadings generic parameters, like I did.

Is that what you are asking about?

Because in case with generics:

interface Overloading {
  <T extends number>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): number
  <T extends string>(datum: string, element: string, defaultValue: T): string
}

T is either number or string, but not the union one.

  • This looks interesting. Could you please expand on what how this works; the Overloading interface? – Niall Nov 18 '20 at 23:50
  • Thanks, I get where this going. I think, although maybe more complex than I want for this particular problem, I will find useful in other areas. – Niall Nov 19 '20 at 7:49
  • 1
    I use overloads for event handlers. For example for SocketIO lib. – captain-yossarian Nov 19 '20 at 7:52

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