When an EJB application receives several requests (work load) it can manage this work load just POOLING the EJBs, so when each EJB object is being used by a thread, the next threads will have to wait queued until some EJB ends up the work (avoiding overloading and efficiency degradation of the system).

Spring is using stateless singletons (not pooling at all) that are used by an "out of control" number of threads.

Is there a way to do something to control the way the work load is going to be delivered? (equivalent to the EJB instance pooling).

Thank you!

  • I'd worry more about "out of control threads." Any solution you obtain will only mask that problem. – duffymo Jun 27 '11 at 10:06
  • @duffymo Well, i meant "out of control NUMBER of threads", this is OK with the programming model that Spring offers you. Whay worries me is wether there is a way of controlling this "number" or not. – edutesoy Jun 27 '11 at 11:44
  • Where are the incoming threads coming from? Is is a web app? – sourcedelica Jun 27 '11 at 13:39
  • @ericacm It can be a webapp throught a servlet, or a web service, or a RMI invocation, or a MDP (Message Driven Pojo receiving JMS messages). – edutesoy Jun 27 '11 at 13:48
  • 2
    In the case of the web app, the servlet container has a pool of threads that determine how many incoming HTTP requests it can handle simultaneously. In the case of the message driven POJO the JMS configuration defines a similar thread pool handing incoming JMS messages. Each of these threads would then access the Spring beans. – sourcedelica Jun 27 '11 at 13:56
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the case of the web app, the servlet container has a pool of threads that determine how many incoming HTTP requests it can handle simultaneously. In the case of the message driven POJO the JMS configuration defines a similar thread pool handing incoming JMS messages. Each of these threads would then access the Spring beans.

Googling around for RMI threading it looks like there is no way to configure thread pooling for RMI. Each RMI client is allocated a thread. In this case you could use Spring's Task Executor framework to do the pooling. Using <task:executor id="executor" pool-size="10"/> in your context config will set up a executor with 10 threads. Then annotate the methods of your Spring bean that will be handling the work with @Async.

Using the Spring task executor you could leave the Servlet and JMS pool configuration alone and configure the pool for your specific work in one place.

  • Good because in fact there is no need to manage the work load in spring, since it can always be done before invoking any Spring bean in most cases (well, for RMI we need to do kind of a workaround... but acceptable). Thank you! – edutesoy Jun 27 '11 at 15:34
  • +1 for the Async way – Ralph Jun 29 '11 at 7:34

To achieve a behaviour similar to the EJB pooling, you could define your own custom scope. Have a look at SimpleThreadScope and the example referenced from this class' javadoc.

The difference between Spring and EJB is, that Spring allows multiple threads on an single instance of an bean, while in EJB you have only one tread per bean (at one point in time).

So you do not need any pooling in Spring for this topic. But on the other hand you need take care that you implement your beans in a threadsave way.


From the comments:

Yes I need it if I want to limit the number of threads that can use my beans simultaneously

One (maybe not the best) way to handle this is to implement the application in normal spring style (no limits). And than have a "front-controller" that accept the client request. But instead of invoking the service directly, it invokes the service asyncron (@Async). May you use some kind of async proxy instead of making the service itselfe asyncron.

class Controller{... 
  Object doStuff() {return asyncProxy.doStuffAsync().get();}
}
class AsyncProxy{... 
   @Async Future<Object> duStuffAscny{return service.doStuff();
}
class Service{... 
   Object doStuff{return new Object();}
}

Then you only need to enable springs Async Support, and there you can configure the Pool used for the Threads.

In this case I would use some kind of front controller, that starts an new Async

  • I know, but my question goes in the direction of "how can spring manage the number of threads that are going to use a bean" to avoid a decrease of the efficiency or even the crash of the server (out of resources). – edutesoy Jun 27 '11 at 11:16
  • @edutesoy: Simply by paying no attention to it. Or more precice: by allowing the threads to access the objects without syncronization. -- Think of the way what EJB does when an request occoures and why the pool is needed. Then think of Spring without that "syncronization" stuff, then you will see that such a pool is not needed. – Ralph Jun 27 '11 at 11:36
  • Yes I need it if I want to limit the number of threads that can use my beans simultaneously, to avoid "out of resources" problems. For example, if I have 1000 request, all of them are going to proceed, even if my system is only able to handle 100 simultaneous requests (for memory limitations, for instance). I want the other 900 to wait until some of the former 100 have already finished its job. – edutesoy Jun 27 '11 at 11:50
  • @edutesoy: see my extended answer -- now I noticed ericacm has the same idea. – Ralph Jun 29 '11 at 7:33

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