1

I can't seem to find a solution to create image from direct pixel data in Python. My current attempt looked like this:

imdata = b'\xff\x00\x00\x00\xff\x00\xff\x00\xff\x00\x00\x00\xff\x00\x00\x00\xff\x00\xff\x00\xff\x00\x00\x00\xff'
imtest = Image.frombuffer('1', (5, 5), imdata, 'raw', '1', 0, 1)
blackDraw.bitmap((50, 50), imtest, fill = None)

The image intended should be a monochrome "X":

x___x
_x_x_
__x__
_x_x_
x___x

However, when displayed (on e-paper screen, actually), it looks like this:

xxxxx
_____
_____
_____
xxxxx

What am I doing wrong? How can I create an image from direct pixel data?

2 Answers 2

1

I found the issue. Documentation of PIL seems a little bit misleading, because it says:

Mode

The mode of an image defines the type and depth of a pixel in the image. The current release supports the following standard modes: 1 (1-bit pixels, black and white, stored as 8-bit pixels)

Source: http://www.pythonware.com/media/data/pil-handbook.pdf

Other documentations are even more clear on the pixel storage:

Modes

The mode of an image is a string which defines the type and depth of a pixel in the image. Each pixel uses the full range of the bit depth. So a 1-bit pixel has a range of 0-1, an 8-bit pixel has a range of 0-255 and so on. The current release supports the following standard modes:

1 (1-bit pixels, black and white, stored with one pixel per byte)

Source: https://pillow.readthedocs.io/en/stable/handbook/concepts.html#concept-modes

It seems though, that even if pixels are stored 1-byte per pixel, they are actually being read from bytes 8-pixels per byte.

imdata = b'\x82\x44\x28\x10\x28\x44\x82'
imtest = Image.frombytes('1', (7, 7), imdata, 'raw', '1', 0, 1)
blackDraw.bitmap((150,150), imtest, fill = None)

Usage of mathematical libraries is an overkill for me, because I'm trying to store pixel-perfect bitmap fonts in the code and use them to print nice text on e-paper screen. TTF fonts are obviously working, but they are in most cases designed to be displayed in antialiasing and when drawn on monochrome screen they have very ugly, serrated edges.

1

You are using an Incorrect mode.

imtest = PIL.Image.frombytes('L', (5, 5), imdata)
plt.imshow(imtest, 'gray')

Also you could do:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
X = np.array([int(i) for i in imdata]).reshape(5,5)
plt.imshow(X, 'gray')

enter image description here

1
  • I actually need to use "1" mode, because the image is later passed to library drawing the image on the e-paper and it has to be monochromatic. But the mode turned out to be the problem in the end too.
    – Spook
    Commented Nov 20, 2020 at 11:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.