51

Unable to identify what's happening in my next.js app. As fs is a default file system module of nodejs. It is giving the error of module not found.

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4
  • Try a fresh npm install after removing the node_modules folder Nov 20, 2020 at 8:41
  • As @AjitZero said that would be the issue. You can also remove package-lock.json and run npm cache clean and then npm install Nov 20, 2020 at 8:44
  • I deleted node_modules and package-lock.json and then npm cache clean and npm install...but still the same error appears. Nov 20, 2020 at 10:39
  • 3
    You cant use fs module in browser its a nodejs module.
    – Talg123
    Nov 21, 2020 at 15:55

13 Answers 13

72

If you use fs, be sure it's only within getInitialProps or getServerSideProps. (anything includes server-side rendering).

You may also need to create a next.config.js file with the following content to get the client bundle to build:

For webpack4

module.exports = {
  webpack: (config, { isServer }) => {
    // Fixes npm packages that depend on `fs` module
    if (!isServer) {
      config.node = {
        fs: 'empty'
      }
    }

    return config
  }
}

For webpack5

module.exports = {
  webpack5: true,
  webpack: (config) => {
    config.resolve.fallback = { fs: false };

    return config;
  },
};

Note: for other modules such as path, you can add multiple arguments such as

{
  fs: false,
  path: false
}
2
  • 2
    Gold answer! Just that I also had to add path: false after fs: false. Oct 22, 2021 at 13:45
  • 1
    As the question is asked about fs only, @JusticeBringer. I might not be able to add in the code but let me add it as a note.
    – Arjun Kava
    Oct 26, 2021 at 6:47
23

I spent hours on this and the solution is also here on Stackoverflow but on different issue -> https://stackoverflow.com/a/67478653/17562602

Hereby I asked for MOD permission to reshare this, since this issue is the first one to show up on Google and probably more and more people stumble would upon the same problem as I am, so I'll try to saved them some sweats

Soo, You need to add this in your next.config.js

    module.exports = {
  future: {
    webpack5: true, // by default, if you customize webpack config, they switch back to version 4. 
      // Looks like backward compatibility approach.
  },
  webpack(config) {
    config.resolve.fallback = {
      ...config.resolve.fallback, // if you miss it, all the other options in fallback, specified
        // by next.js will be dropped. Doesn't make much sense, but how it is
      fs: false, // the solution
    };

    return config;
  },
};

It works for like a charm for me

0
14

Minimal reproducible example

A clean minimal example will be beneficial to Webpack beginners since auto splitting based on usage is so mind-blowingly magic.

Working hello world baseline:

pages/index.js

// Client + server code.

export default function IndexPage(props) {
  return <div>{props.msg}</div>
}

// Server-only code.

export function getStaticProps() {
  return { props: { msg: 'hello world' } }
}

package.json

{
  "name": "test",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "scripts": {
    "dev": "next",
    "build": "next build",
    "start": "next start"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "next": "12.0.7",
    "react": "17.0.2",
    "react-dom": "17.0.2"
  }
}

Run with:

npm install
npm run dev

Now let's add a dummy require('fs') to blow things up:

// Client + server code.

export default function IndexPage(props) {
  return <div>{props.msg}</div>
}

// Server-only code.

const fs = require('fs')

export function getStaticProps() {
  return { props: { msg: 'hello world' } }
}

fails with:

Module not found: Can't resolve 'fs' 

which is not too surprising, since there was no way for Next.js to know that that fs was server only, and we wouldn't want it to just ignore random require errors, right? Next.js only knows that for getStaticProps because that's a hardcoded Next.js function name.

OK, so let's inform Next.js by using fs inside getStaticProps, the following works again:

// Client + server code.

export default function IndexPage(props) {
  return <div>{props.msg}</div>
}

// Server-only code.

const fs = require('fs')

export function getStaticProps() {
  fs
  return { props: { msg: 'hello world' } }
}

Mind equals blown. So we understand that any mention of fs inside of the body of getStaticProps, even an useless one like the above, makes Next.js/Webpack understand that it is going to be server-only.

Things would work the same for getServerSideProps and getStaticPaths.

Higher order components (HOCs) have to be in their own files

Now, the way that we factor out IndexPage and getStaticProps across different but similar pages is to use HOCs, which are just functions that return other functions.

HOCs will normally be put outside of pages/ and then required from multiple locations, but when you are about to factor things out to generalize, you might be tempted to put them directly in the pages/ file temporarily, something like:

// Client + server code.

import Link from 'next/link'

export function makeIndexPage(isIndex) {
  return (props) => {
    return <>
      <Link href={isIndex ? '/index' : '/notindex'}>
        <a>{isIndex ? 'index' : 'notindex'}</a>
      </Link>
      <div>{props.fs}</div>
      <div>{props.isBlue}</div>
    </>
  }
}

export default makeIndexPage(true)

// Server-only code.

const fs = require('fs')

export function makeGetStaticProps(isBlue) {
  return () => {
    return { props: {
      fs: Object.keys(fs).join(' '),
      isBlue,
    } }
  }
}

export const getStaticProps = makeGetStaticProps(true)

but if you do this you will be saddened to see:

Module not found: Can't resolve 'fs' 

So we understand another thing: the fs usage has to be directly inside the getStaticProps function body, Webpack can't catch it in subfunctions.

The only way to solve this is to have a separate file for the backend-only stuff as in:

pages/index.js

// Client + server code.

import { makeIndexPage } from "../front"

export default makeIndexPage(true)

// Server-only code.

import { makeGetStaticProps } from "../back"

export const getStaticProps = makeGetStaticProps(true)

pages/notindex.js

// Client + server code.

import { makeIndexPage } from "../front"

export default makeIndexPage(false)

// Server-only code.

import { makeGetStaticProps } from "../back"

export const getStaticProps = makeGetStaticProps(false)

front.js

// Client + server code.

import Link from 'next/link'

export function makeIndexPage(isIndex) {
  return (props) => {
    console.error('page');
    return <>
      <Link href={isIndex ? '/notindex' : '/'}>
        <a>{isIndex ? 'notindex' : 'index'}</a>
      </Link>
      <div>{props.fs}</div>
      <div>{props.isBlue}</div>
    </>
  }
}

back.js

// Server-only code.

const fs = require('fs')

export function makeGetStaticProps(isBlue) {
  return () => {
    return { props: {
      fs: Object.keys(fs).join(' '),
      isBlue,
    } }
  }
}

Webpack must see that name makeGetStaticProps getting assigned to getStaticProps, so it decides that the entire back file is server-only.

Note that it does not work if you try to merge back.js and front.js into a single file, probably because when you do export default makeIndexPage(true) webpack necessarily tries to pull the entire front.js file into the frontend, which includes the fs, so it fails.

This leads to a natural (and basically almost mandatory) split of library files between:

  • front.js and front/*: front-end + backend files. These are safe for the frontend. And the backend can do whatever the frontend can do (we are doing SSR right?) so those are also usable from the backend.

    Perhaps this is the idea behind the conventional "components" folder in many official examples. But that is a bad name, because that folder should not only contain components, but also any library non-component helpers/constants that will be used from the frontend.

  • back.js and back/* (or alternatively anything outside of front/*): backend only files. These can only be used by the backend, importing them on frontend will lead to the error

8

fs,path or other node native modules can be used only inside server-side code, like "getServerSide" functions. If you try to use it in client you get error even you just console.log it.. That console.log should run inside server-side functions as well.

When you import "fs" and use it in server-side, next.js is clever enough to see that you use it in server-side so it wont add that import into the client bundle

One of the packages that I used was giving me this error, I fixed this with

module.exports = {
 
  webpack: (config, { isServer }) => {
    if (!isServer) {
      config.resolve.fallback.fs = false
    }

    return config
  },
  
}

but this was throwing warning on terminal:

"Critical dependency: require function is used in a way in which

 dependencies cannot be statically extracted"

Then I tried to load the node module on the browser. I copied the "min.js" of the node module from the node_modules and placed in "public/js/myPackage.js" and load it with Script

export default function BaseLayout({children}) {
  return (
    <>
      <Script
        // this in public folder
        src="/js/myPackage.js"
        // this means this script will be loaded first
        strategy="beforeInteractive"
      />
    </>
  )
}

This package was attached to window object and in node_modules source code's index.js:

if (typeof window !== "undefined") {
  window.TruffleContract = contract;
}

So I could access to this script as window.TruffleContract. BUt this was not an efficient way.

3

It might be that the module you are trying to implement is not supposed to run in a browser. I.e. it's server-side only.

3
  • 32
    why is this a verified answer while its not even an answer ?
    – asma
    Jun 21, 2021 at 11:54
  • 1
    @asma Firstly there is nothing like a "verified answer" here on StackOverflow. Secondly, the OP had accepted this answer and not that of ArjunKava because the latter was posted 6 months after they had asked the question, and hadn't cared much to accept a better one since. Also, this is a perfectly valid reasoning. Server only packages can and do cause such issues if used in client-side code. PS: after the outdated answers update this answer is no longer pinned to top, so it shouldn't be an issue because this was the answer that helped OP when they needed, and hence is the accepted one.
    – brc-dd
    Oct 26, 2021 at 6:58
  • @asma It provides an answer to the problem and was accepted by the OP. It may not go in to a solution in details like Yilmaz's answer, but there is nothing technically wrong with it at all. "Verified answers" are not a thing, the OP accepts the answer that worked for them. Nov 24, 2021 at 1:39
3

If trying to use fs-extra in Next.js, this worked for me

module.exports = {
  webpack: (config) => {
    config.resolve.fallback = { fs: false, path: false, stream: false, constants: false };
    return config;

  }
}
1
  • 1
    End with return config; Apr 18 at 21:39
2

I got this error in my NextJS app because I was missing export in

export function getStaticProps()
1
  • 3
    I had a related error, but instead I misspelled getServerSideProps so I was utilizing the fs module client side. An easy mistake to make! Oct 27, 2021 at 0:42
1

For me clearing the cache npm cache clean -f

and then updating the node version to the latest stable release(14.17.0) worked

0

For me, the problem was the old version of the node.js installed. It requires node.js version 14 and higher. The solution was to go to the node.js web page, download the latest version and just install it. And then re-run the project. All worked!

1
  • It did not work for me when i tried building with node 14.
    – vijayst
    Aug 30, 2021 at 8:19
0

I had the same issue when I was trying to use babel.

For me this worked:

#add a .babelrc file to the root of the project and define presets and plugins (in my case, I had some issues with the macros of babel, so I defined them)

{
    "presets": ["next/babel"],
    "plugins": ["macros"]
}

after that shut down your server and run it again

0

I had this exact issue. My problem was that I was importing types that I had declared in a types.d.ts file.

I was importing it like this, thanks to the autofill provided by VSCode.

import {CUSTOM_TYPE} from './types'

It should have been like this:

import {CUSTOM_TYPE} from './types.d'

In my case, I think the .d was unnecessary so I ended up removing it entirely and renamed my file to types.ts.

Weird enough, it was being imported directly into index.tsx without issues, but any helper files/functions inside the src directory would give me errors.

0

I ran into this in a NextJS application because I had defined a new helper function directly below getServerSideProps(), but had not yet called that function inside getServerSideProps().

I'm not sure why this created a problem, but it did. I could only get it to work by either calling that function, removing it, or commenting it out.

1
0
/** @type {import('next').NextConfig} */
module.exports = {
  reactStrictMode: false,
  webpack5: true,
  webpack: (config) => {
    config.resolve.fallback = {
      fs: false,
      net: false,
      dns: false,
      child_process: false,
      tls: false,
    };

    return config;
  },
};

This code fixed my problem and I want to share.Add this code to your next.config file.i'm using

webpack5

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