1

I am attempting to assign different values to the same variable in javascript based on whether an element exists in the DOM or not. So far I have

if(document.body.contains(document.getElementById('a'))){
       var newVar = document.getElementById('a').innerHTML;
    } else if(document.body.contains(document.getElementById('b'))){
        var newVar = document.getElementById('b').innerHTML;
    }

However, this only works if the checked variable 'a' exists. I am aware that this approach is perhaps a bit unconventional, and was wondering if there was a simple way to do it, or if it is impossible since it's the same variable declared.

4
  • Not sure what the current problem is? (You could perhaps avoid a warning by removing the second declaration and just having newVar = document.getElemenyById('b").innerHTML; in the second if). Do you think you can better explain what it is that you are trying to achieve?
    – nick zoum
    Nov 20 '20 at 13:20
  • Sure @nickzoum, this is for a tampermonkey script to grab different values from a webpage. Variable a represents one possible value, and b represents the other. Since there is no way to correctly determine what html element id name the page will use, I am trying to iterate through all the possible values it can be. Nov 20 '20 at 13:25
  • @MuteOriginal Is it possible for both the id="a" and id="b" elements to be present in the page? What should happen in that case?
    – nick zoum
    Nov 20 '20 at 13:26
  • It is not possible for both to exist @nickzoum. I had already thought of that, and confirmed. Nov 20 '20 at 13:28
2

If you just want to get the innerHTML property of the first present element you can use a querySelector, where the query consists of the searching queries of each of the elements separated by ,

Something like:

var dom = document.querySelector("#a, #b");
if (dom instanceof HTMLElement) console.log("Found :" + dom.innerHTML);
else console.log("Not found");

Examples:

var newVar = (document.querySelector("#a, #b") || {}).innerHTML;
console.log(newVar || "Not found");
<div id="a">Hello A</div>
<div id="b">Hello B</div>

var newVar = (document.querySelector("#a, #b") || {}).innerHTML;
console.log(newVar || "Not found");
<div id="a">Hello A</div>

var newVar = (document.querySelector("#a, #b") || {}).innerHTML;
console.log(newVar || "Not found");
<div id="b">Hello B</div>

var newVar = (document.querySelector("#a, #b") || {}).innerHTML;
console.log(newVar || "Not found");

6
  • Thanks @nickzoum, however, only element a or element b can exist. Wouldn't that mean that this method wouldn't work since it is basically finding each of the elements, and determining which occurs first. Nov 20 '20 at 13:35
  • 1
    @MutedOriginal I added more examples so you can see how it works, run each one of them to see the result for each case.
    – nick zoum
    Nov 20 '20 at 13:43
  • Thanks. I modified it a bit and got it running perfectly. +1 Nov 20 '20 at 13:49
  • I'm glad I could help and please ask me if there is anything unclear to you about this answer.
    – nick zoum
    Nov 20 '20 at 13:54
  • 1
    @MutedOriginal You can add as many ass you want in there, just make sure to separate them using ,
    – nick zoum
    Nov 20 '20 at 13:59
0

You can write the below code in javascript

if( document.getElementById('a') ){ 
  var newVar = document.getElementById('a').innerHTML;
} else if( document.getElementById('b') ){ 
  var newVar = document.getElementById('b').innerHTML;
}
1
  • what I am trying to do is check if an element exists, and if it does based on whether its a or b, assign that value to newVar. Therefore, I don't see how this approach would work, since both element a and b must exist. Nov 20 '20 at 13:30
0

There is no need for writing this check 'document.body.contains'. Simply get the element by its ID

1
  • the element does not always exists. Either one or the other exists, so therefore this approach wouldn't work. It would simply throw an error when it couldn't grab one of the elements Nov 20 '20 at 13:48

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