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I'm asking if is there a way to convert a unit of a string into a char? to be more clear, is there a way to legalize this instruction:

var
    s : String;

begin
    s:='stackoverflow';
    ord(s[1]); // Illegal expression    
end.    

Getting the ASCII code from one unit of a string ( which has to be a char ) demanded a complicated algorithm in Object Pascal, can I do it in an easier way?

  • 1
    Um, s[1] is a character; it's the first character in s ('s' in your case). Ord(s[1]) is its codepoint (ASCII code if ASCII, 115 in your case). But the title of your question asks if it is possible to convert a string into a char. The answer is "no, unless the string happens to have length 1". But you cannot write Ord(s[1]) as a statement, just like you cannot write 115 as a statement. However, ShowMessage(IntToStr(Ord(s[1]))) works. – Andreas Rejbrand Nov 20 at 19:34
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    That's because you cannot write Ord(s[1]) as a statement. Ord(s[1]) is the same thing as 115, and you cannot have 115 as a statement: if 1+1=2 then ShowMessage('Yes') else 115; It's nonsense. Just try to write Beep; 115; OpenCDTray or whatever. – Andreas Rejbrand Nov 20 at 19:41
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    @AndreasRejbrand "Ord(s[1]) is its codepoint" - technically, it is a code unit, not a codepoint. Two different things. – Remy Lebeau Nov 20 at 19:42
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    If you do ShowMessage(IntToStr(Ord(s[1]))) or Memo1.Lines.Add(IntToStr(Ord(s[1]))) it will work! – Andreas Rejbrand Nov 20 at 19:43
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    @RemyLebeau: I know, but I cannot edit the comment any longer. – Andreas Rejbrand Nov 20 at 19:43
3

You can't use Ord(s[1]) as its own statement like you are, but you can use it as an expression within a larger statement, eg:

var
  s : String;
  i: Integer;
begin
  s := 'stackoverflow';
  i := Ord(s[1]); // i = 115
end.
| improve this answer | |
  • I feel ashamed for committing such a mistake. Ord() is a function and has to return a value, sometimes I become blind. – CouldnoT B-Zone Nov 20 at 19:50
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    @CouldnoTB-Zone A function call would have compiled just fine in your example. But Ord() is an "Intrinsic Routine"(docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/Sydney/en/…) and behave more like a typecast than an actual function call. – Ken Bourassa Nov 20 at 20:32

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