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I am writing a library that must depend libraries that are not presently compiling with support for the new standard. I would like to compile a library which must depend on those libraries with std=c++0x. Are there any problems with doing this?

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If you mix libraries compiled with different compiler options then you must ensure that the ABI for the data types in the interface is the same. Some data types (such as std::string) have different interfaces and requirements between C++03 and C++0x, so interfaces that use them must be careful.

If your interfaces only use built-in types and your own classes, and these do not themselves use any standard library classes then all should be OK. Otherwise you will need to check the specific subset you are using.

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    Only using C at the interface isn't sufficient in general. It doesn't work when linking statically, under Unix, it requires special options to dlopen when linking dynamically, and under Windows, there was a bug in the library pulled in by /MD or /MDd which meant that it would fail if either of the libraries used std::string and were compiled with different options. (I've heard that this bug has been fixed in VC10.) – James Kanze Jun 27 '11 at 15:43
  • @James: I agree in general, but this issue is tagged gcc. As I understand it, the intent of the gcc library developers is that provided you should be able to use -std=c++98 and -std=c++0x code in the same program, as long as the interface between these bits of code only uses compatible types. e.g. on Linux there is only one libstdc++.so binary, used by both -std=c++98 and -std=c++0x code alike. – Anthony Williams Jun 27 '11 at 15:55
  • There's the intent of the developers, and there's what actually happens. I've had problems getting dynamic_cast to work when it was executed in one .so, and the object was constructed in another. And with the options to dlopen necessary for the dynamic_cast to work, you will end up sharing some of the other functions, including member functions of std::vector, etc. And the size and layout of std::vector depends on compiler options; you don't even have to change versions for it to fail. – James Kanze Jun 27 '11 at 17:53
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The simple answer is no, unless the vendor explicitly guarantees it (and even then). Practically speaking, all code linked together must use the same standard library, and be compiled with the same version of the compiler, using the same options. There are ways around this, at least for dynamically linked libraries, but they only work if the interface between the libraries is pure C, and you take special steps when linking (special options with dlopen---neither library uses std::string in VC++ pre-version 10, etc.). Otherwise, you're looking for trouble.

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