1

Im trying to figure out how I can make two list separating name and DOB from a text file. I've seen examples as to how to do it if it was like the following in the text file: "Bob Willus, 03/25/1993" But my text file looks like this:

James B W Bevis
10/12/1943
Henry Bemis
8/4/2008
Romney Wordsworth
8/29/2012

So far this is what I have:

file = open("contactsLab4.txt.","r")
names = []
birthdate = []
for line in file:
    splitLine = line.split("\n")
    names.append(splitLine[0])
    birthdate.append(splitLine[0])
print(names)
print(birthdate)

This is the outcome:

    ['James B W Bevis', '10/12/1943', 'Henry Bemis', '8/4/2008', 'Romney Wordsworth', '8/29/2012', 
    'Osborne Cox', '1/21/1989', 'Somerset Frisby', '9/5/2010', 'Revis Jacara', '2/16/1935', 'Bartlet 
    Finchley', '11/30/2001', 'Penthor Mul', '5/3/1928', 'Walter Bedeker', '4/27/1996', 'Clegg Forbes', 
    '3/18/2004', 'Jeremy Wickwire', '12/9/1999', 'Luther Dongle', '7/24/1978', 'Klim Dokachin', 
   '10/1/1975', 'Archibald Beechcroft', '6/19/1991', 'Oliver Crangle', '5/6/1954', 'Agnes Grep', 
    '11/4/2013', 'William Feathersmith', '1/11/1967', 'Kalin Tros', '12/28/1955', 'Clovis Bagwell', 
    '7/19/2003', 'Wallace V Whipple', '3/8/1939', 'Jeff Myrtlebank', '8/23/2001', 'Latham Bine', 
    '2/2/1949', 'Jim Pembry', '4/1/1992']
    ['James B W Bevis', '10/12/1943', 'Henry Bemis', '8/4/2008', 'Romney Wordsworth', '8/29/2012', 
    'Osborne Cox', '1/21/1989', 'Somerset Frisby', '9/5/2010', 'Revis Jacara', '2/16/1935', 'Bartlet 
    Finchley', '11/30/2001', 'Penthor Mul', '5/3/1928', 'Walter Bedeker', '4/27/1996', 'Clegg Forbes', 
    '3/18/2004', 'Jeremy Wickwire', '12/9/1999', 'Luther Dongle', '7/24/1978', 'Klim Dokachin', 
    '10/1/1975', 'Archibald Beechcroft', '6/19/1991', 'Oliver Crangle', '5/6/1954', 'Agnes Grep', 
    '11/4/2013', 'William Feathersmith', '1/11/1967', 'Kalin Tros', '12/28/1955', 'Clovis Bagwell', 
    '7/19/2003', 'Wallace V Whipple', '3/8/1939', 'Jeff Myrtlebank', '8/23/2001', 'Latham Bine', 
    '2/2/1949', 'Jim Pembry', '4/1/1992']

Please and thank you!

  • Try something like: for item_a, item_b in zip(list_[::2], list_[1::2]). Create list list_ with an even number of elements to test what this logic does; then work to apply it to your case. – S3DEV Nov 21 at 22:35
0

naturally you get the same for both, because you don't make any distinction between them, you need to identified when the line contain a name and when it contain a date, there is a number of ways to do that depending on how is your data organize or what a given line contains, for example you can check what the first character in the line is, if its a number you can assume that is a date, otherwise you can assume is a name:

with open("contactsLab4.txt.","r") as file:
    names = []
    birthdate = []
    for line in file:
        line = line.strip() #remove trailing "\n"
        if line[0].isdecimal():
            birthdate.append(line)
        else:
            names.append(line)

    print(names)
    print(birthdate)
| improve this answer | |
0

I had solved your problem with isDigit() function:

file = open("contactsLab4.txt","r")
names = []
birthdate = []

for line in file:
    splitedLine = line.split("\n")

    if not (splitedLine[0][0].isdigit()):
        names.append(splitedLine[0])
    else:
        birthdate.append(splitedLine[0])

print(names)
print(birthdate)

file.close()

Your provided input is:

James B W Bevis
10/12/1943
Henry Bemis
8/4/2008
Romney Wordsworth
8/29/2012

Your output with my provided code will be:

['James B W Bevis', 'Henry Bemis', 'Romney Wordsworth']
['10/12/1943', '8/4/2008', '8/29/2012']
| improve this answer | |
0

You can do something like this since the name and DOB are in separate lines.

    names = []
    birthdate = []

    with open("contactsLab4.txt.", "r") as file:
        for index, line in enumerate(file):
            splitLine = line.split("\n")
            if index % 2 == 0:
                names.append(splitLine[0])
            else:
                birthdate.append(splitLine[0])

    print(names)
    print(birthdate)

You can although use rstrip to automatically remove the newline character.

| improve this answer | |
  • Recommendation: Update to use the with convention to open and read the file. I realise the OP doesn’t use this, so a good opportunity to introduce a best practice. Additionally, if used, the returned TextIOWrapper object is a generator, so readlines() is no longer required. – S3DEV Nov 21 at 22:40
0

another way to do the same thing as other answers but using list comprehension is as follows:

with open('path/to/file.txt', 'r') as f:
    a = f.read()
a = a.split('\n')
name = [l1[i] for i in range(0,len(a),2)]
date = [l1[i+1] for i in range(0,len(a),2)]

Output is:

name=
['James B W Bevis',
 'Henry Bemis',
 'Romney Wordsworth',
 'Osborne Cox',
 'Somerset Frisby',
 'Revis Jacara',
 'Bartlet Finchley',
 'Penthor Mul',
 'Walter Bedeker',
 'Clegg Forbes',
 'Jeremy Wickwire',
 'Luther Dongle',
 'Klim Dokachin',
 'Archibald Beechcroft',
 'Oliver Crangle',
 'Agnes Grep',
 'William Feathersmith',
 'Kalin Tros',
 'Clovis Bagwell',
 'Wallace V Whipple',
 'Jeff Myrtlebank',
 'Latham Bine',
 'Jim Pembry']

date=
['10/12/1943',
 '8/4/2008',
 '8/29/2012',
 '1/21/1989',
 '9/5/2010',
 '2/16/1935',
 '11/30/2001',
 '5/3/1928',
 '4/27/1996',
 '3/18/2004',
 '12/9/1999',
 '7/24/1978',
 '10/1/1975',
 '6/19/1991',
 '5/6/1954',
 '11/4/2013',
 '1/11/1967',
 '12/28/1955',
 '7/19/2003',
 '3/8/1939',
 '8/23/2001',
 '2/2/1949',
 '4/1/1992']

you can also do regex to make sure you are getting dates in date list comprehension like so

date = [l1[i+1] for i in range(0,len(a),2) if re.match('\d+/\d+/\d+',l1[i+1])]

this method will however now work if the string for dates isn't in the same format always and will error out.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can read the whole file into a list, then sort out names and birthdates later. This ends up being a little more concise than you example code.

E.g.

with open("test.txt") as infile:
    everything = [line.strip('\n') for line in infile]
    names = everything[::2]
    birthdates = everything[1::2]

print(names)
print(birthdates)

The indexing of everything uses slices to construct new lists of all the odd and even indexed elements.

Note also the use of the context manager to open the file. with open("test.txt") as infile: opens the file and allows access through the infile variable, but also handles closing the file for you at the end of the indented block.

| improve this answer | |
-1
with open("contactsLab4.txt.", "r") as file:
    names = []
    birthdate = []
    lines = file.readlines()
    for i in range(0, len(lines), 2):
        names.append(lines[i].rstrip())
    for i in range(1, len(lines), 2):
        birthdate.append(lines[i].rstrip())
    print(names)
    print(birthdate)

Returns

['James B W Bevis', 'Henry Bemis', 'Romney Wordsworth']
['10/12/1943', '8/4/2008', '8/29/2012']

I'm not sure if the . at the end of the filename is a typing failure.
By using with open(...) as ...:, you let Python handle your file. It will close it automatically afterwards after the with bloc.
The use of rstrip() delete the trailing newline character at the end of the string.

| improve this answer | |

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