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I am using form requests in Laravel for validation. I have noticed a pattern that emerges all the time and I couldn't find a solution for it on SE (or at least googling it didn't help me).

Let's say we are creating an API and we are using Laravel's apiResource to create the usual CRUD methods: store, update and delete

Obviously, when we are storing a new record, the field id is not required, but the rest of the fields might be required (and in most cases are). But when we are updating a record, we face the opposite situation. id is required while other fields are no longer required.

Is it possible to handle this situation with one form request in Laravel? Can we use Laravel's required_if in an intelligent way to avoid code duplication?

Edit: it doesn't have to be necessarily a Laravel solution. A solution that uses PHP would be fine too (as long as it is clean and follows SOLID principles).

  • Are you exposing the id field as a form input which can be manipulated by the user? If id is the primary key then it's not advisable to expose the id field for manipulation via a form. And if you are not exposing the id field via a form then it doesn't even require any validation I guess. – Donkarnash 2 days ago
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What about checking the method and then returning a set of rules based on that method? For instance, I have an InvoiceFormRequest with the following rules. So I'm able to use one form request for two different methods.

/**
* Get the validation rules that apply to the request.
*
* @return array
*/
public function rules()
{
    if ($this->isMethod('post')) {
        return [
           'template' => 'required',
           'due_by_date'   => 'required',
           'description'   => 'required',
           'charge_items'  => 'required',
        ];
    }

    if ($this->isMethod('put')) {
        return [
            'due_by_date'   => 'required',
            'description'   => 'required',
            'charge_items'  => 'required',
        ];
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you. This is a good solution. I also came up with a similar solution, only using different functions in Laravel. (+1) – stressed out 2 days ago
  • @stressedout this is not a bad solution, but you are still holding rules in only one file (breaking SOLID), but if you have to also use authorize you are going to do another if for that part. – matiaslauriti 2 days ago
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I faced this problem lots of times and I understand your frustration...

From my point of view and professional experience, the best solution was all the time to have specific FormRequests for each case:

  • One for store with its own rules
  • Other for update with similar rules but not same as store
  • And last one for delete (for sure way less rules than the others and no duplication)

I know you said "no code duplication", but as it is right now, that is not possible (but you should not have code duplication as I stated before).

You said "as long as it is clean and follows SOLID principles", remember SOLID, S = Single Responsability, so if you want to solve this issue with a single FormRequest you are already breaking S. I cannot image a FormRequest with 10 or 15 inputs and those depends on if it is store, update, or delete. That is going to not be clean and for sure will not follow SOLID principles.

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  • Well, I have to partially agree with your last paragraph. But I suppose SOLID is open for interpretation because the definition of what should be taken as "responsibility" could differ person by person. As for me, validation of incoming data for a model is one responsibility, even if it's broken down to several subcases. I think I might be able to come up with a solution, so I'll let you know if I can find it (if you won't mind). – stressed out 2 days ago
  • @stressedout Please, share your best solution with me ! I would gladly have a look at it ! But no, SOLID is not open for interpretation, Single Responsibility is Single Responsibility, for example, if your code only shares URLs on medias (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc), your responsibility would not be to check which media you want and have a single file and lot of IFs, you should have 1 file and a pattern that makes it dynamic, but not the legendary 20 cases switch (hope you follow me) – matiaslauriti 2 days ago
  • Well, thank you. I'll be waiting for your feedback when I come up with a solution. But if I happened to write an answer here, please also explain to me why writing if's or case-switch statements are a bad idea because I cannot see a problem with them. – stressed out 2 days ago
  • @stressedout remember that we are using Objects, the idea of OOP is to break everything to the smallest possible case, so in your case the thinking should not be "I have to validate data", it should be "I have to validate data for storing" (that is one responsibility), "I have to validate data for update" (2), "I have to validate data for delete" (3), those are 3 different responsibilities you have to tackle. Think like if you have to do test cases for your code, you will have lot of cases for each of the 3 main concerns, hence 3 different responsibilities. – matiaslauriti 2 days ago
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    @stressedout it is not bad to have if's or case-switch statements, but it could be bad if the best approach is different, as I previously said as an example, if you have code that shares a URL in medias, as a beginner for sure you will use lots of if and switch, you should use a Builder Pattern. I am not 100% good with patterns, it is something I have to master, but it is important to understand basic Patterns like Builder, Mapper, and more. – matiaslauriti 2 days ago
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Here are two possible solutions that I came up with

  1. Use the controller method for returning the proper validation rules:
    public function rules()
    {
        $method = $this->route()->getActionMethod();

        switch($method){
            case 'store':
                return [
                    \\ validation rules
                ]
            ...
        }
    }
  1. Use $this->getMethod() instead of $this->route()->getActionMethod() and validate by HTTP methods instead.

You could also store your validation rules in an array and manipulate it to reduce code duplication.

This resolves the issue of code duplication to a good extent, I think.

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  • 1) I already reply to this on the other user but you are still breaking (SOLID) in a way. Now the controller also has to know which rules to use, if it is in a FormRequest that is the FormRequest responsibility. 2) That is also a good approach. I would always stick to duplicate FormRequests instead of having something not so legible. – matiaslauriti 2 days ago

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