1

Please bear with me, I am new to Python.

The first function I wrote was one to lowercase any uppercase characters in a string that passed through it, which works by itself, while ignoring any non-uppercase alphabetical ASCII characters.

However, when I try to use it in my second function, (which SHOULD use the lowercasing function on whatever the user inputs and then sticks it in a file) I'm left with a file that contains the the string that's initially passed through without any of the lowercasing function.

import os.path
from os import path


def lowercaser(text):
    text = [ord(c) for c in text]
    length = len(text)

    i = 0
    while length != i:
        if 65 <= text[i] <= 90:
            text[i] = text[i] + 32
        i += 1

    text = [chr(c) for c in text]
    text = "".join(text)


def does_rfid_list_exist():
    if path.exists("rfidList.txt"):
        print("File found!")

    else:
        print("File was not located! Creating new file.\n")
        f = open("rfidList.txt", "a+")
        user_input = input("Please enter your name!\n")
        lowercaser(user_input)
        f.write(user_input)
        f.close()


does_rfid_list_exist()

I have no idea why they don't work together, and I've broken it down as far as I can. Any ideas?

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  • the code looks not out of the ordinary , the only issue that I see is even though you are calling the function you are not updating the user_input , return the text from the lower case function as well user_input = lowercaser(user_input) , try using this – Vaebhav Nov 22 at 4:18
  • check out the string methods on the Python docs. You may find a method of interest there. – SIGSTACKFAULT Nov 22 at 4:30
1

You seem to be expecting this call:

lowercaser(user_input)

to change the value of user_input. It won't do this. The reason is that string values are immutable, which means that every time you "change" a string, you create a new one. The original string object is not touched. So in this case, the variable user_input is pointing at a particular string when you call lowercaser. Once that function returns, user_input will still be pointing at the same string. Some other string will exist that will be the result of the processing the function did.

The way this usually works is that the lowercaser function will return the new string as the return value of the function, like this:

user_input = lowercaser(user_input)

This way, you are pointing user_input to a new string, the string that lowercaser produced for you. But to get this to work, you have to fix your lowercaser function to return its result. So you also have to add return text as the last line of your lowercaser function.

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1

You need to first learn how to define a function. You can learn it in w3school or any other source or book.

I am posting the solution here but it won't be productive for you.

Put

return text

in the last line of function. And put

user_input=lowercaser(user_input)

instead of

lowercaser(user_input)
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0

the code looks not out of the ordinary , The only issue that I see is even though you are calling the function you are not updating the user_input

user_input = lowercaser(user_input)

Apart from this , return text from lower case function return text

import os.path
from os import path


def lowercaser(text):
    text = [ord(c) for c in text]
    length = len(text)

    i = 0
    while length != i:
        if 65 <= text[i] <= 90:
            text[i] = text[i] + 32
        i += 1

    text = [chr(c) for c in text]
    text = "".join(text)
    return text #### Change - 1


def does_rfid_list_exist():
    if path.exists("rfidList.txt"):
        print("File found!")

    else:
        print("File was not located! Creating new file.\n")
        f = open("rfidList.txt", "a+")
        user_input = input("Please enter your name!\n")
        user_input = lowercaser(user_input) #### Change - 2
        f.write(user_input)
        f.close()


does_rfid_list_exist()

Using lower() on user_input

import os.path
from os import path


def lowercaser(text):
    text = [ord(c) for c in text]
    length = len(text)

    i = 0
    while length != i:
        if 65 <= text[i] <= 90:
            text[i] = text[i] + 32
        i += 1

    text = [chr(c) for c in text]
    text = "".join(text)
    return text #### Change - 1


def does_rfid_list_exist():
    if path.exists("rfidList.txt"):
        print("File found!")

    else:
        print("File was not located! Creating new file.\n")
        f = open("rfidList.txt", "a+")
        user_input = input("Please enter your name!\n")
        user_input = user_input.lower() ### Change - 2
        f.write(user_input)
        f.close()


does_rfid_list_exist()
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  • you can also use the lower() function natively as well on user_input – Vaebhav Nov 22 at 4:24
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Bruv, there is not return statement, and even if there was the variable isn't stored anywhere. Meaning that text (a local variable that can only be accessed inside the function it originates from), is not accessible, passed on or stored in function does_rfid_list_exist(). Another problem is that user_input, which seems to be the data you are trying to manipulate, does not change after lowercaser() function because nothing is returned and the data isn't stored in anything. What I would do to fix is

To make it so that user_input

return text after text = "".join(text) and replace lowercaser(user_input) with user_input = lowercaser(user_input)

I think you got confused and thought that user_input is a public class of some sort.

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