1

I have a macro that I use to generate some code to call methods dynamically. The macro is more complex than this, but for simplicity let's say it works something like this

def myMacro[T]: Seq[MethodName]

so than when called on

class Hello {
  def one(a: Int, b: UserId): String = a.toString + b.id

  def two(c: Option[Int]): String = ""

  def three(d: Seq[Int], f: Set[Int]): String = ""
}
println(myMacro[Hello]) // Seq("one", "two", "three")

I need this macro to generate code for an internal framework we use at Candu, but I need to be able to call it from the parent's class. So what I want to achieve is:

trait Superclass {
  def aFakeMethod: String = ""

  val methods = myMacro[Self] // FIXME! self is not defined here...
}

class Hello extends Superclass {
  def one(a: Int, b: UserId): String = a.toString + b.id

  def two(c: Option[Int]): String = ""

  def three(d: Seq[Int], f: Set[Int]): String = ""
}
val hi = new Hello
println(hi.methods) // Seq("one", "two", "three")

Because the high number of classes in the framework, modifying the api between Hello and Superclass is very expansive. So I would need a way to do this without changing code in Hello

Any suggestions on how this could be achieved?

  • Is this related to CANDU reactors? – Matthias Berndt Nov 22 '20 at 19:05
  • haha good guess. No, it's related to Candu Labs: candu.ai – mre Nov 22 '20 at 21:58
3

If myMacro worked outside Hello it should work inside Superclass as well

import scala.language.experimental.macros
import scala.reflect.macros.blackbox

def myMacro[T]: Seq[String] = macro impl[T]
def impl[T: c.WeakTypeTag](c: blackbox.Context): c.Tree = {
  import c.universe._
  val methodNames = weakTypeOf[T].decls
    .filter(symb => symb.isMethod && !symb.isConstructor)
    .map(_.name.toString).toList
  val methodNamesTree = methodNames.foldRight[Tree](q"Nil")((name, names) => q"$name :: $names")
  q"..$methodNamesTree"
}

Usage:

sealed trait Superclass {
  def aFakeMethod: String = ""

  val methods = myMacro[Hello]
}

val hi = new Hello
println(hi.methods) // List("one", "two", "three")

If for some reason you can't use the name of Hello you can try to make Superclass sealed and use knownDirectSubclasses

def myMacro1(): Seq[String] = macro impl1
def impl1(c: blackbox.Context)(): c.Tree = {
  import c.universe._
  val child = c.enclosingClass.symbol.asClass.knownDirectSubclasses.head
  q"myMacro[$child]"
}

Usage:

sealed trait Superclass {
  def aFakeMethod: String = ""

  val methods = myMacro1()
}

val hi = new Hello
println(hi.methods) // List("one", "two", "three")

Or you can replace deprecated c.enclosingClass.symbol.asClass with c.internal.enclosingOwner.owner.asClass (now enclosingOwner is val methods, enclosingOwner.owner is trait Superclass).


If you can't make Superclass sealed try to traverse all classes and look for those extending Superclass

def myMacro2(): Seq[Seq[String]] = macro impl2

def impl2(c: blackbox.Context)(): c.Tree = {
  import c.universe._

  def treeSymbol(tree: Tree): Symbol = c.typecheck(tree, mode = c.TYPEmode).symbol
  val enclosingClassSymbol = c.internal.enclosingOwner.owner
  def isEnclosingClass(tree: Tree): Boolean = treeSymbol(tree) == enclosingClassSymbol

  var methodss = Seq[Seq[String]]()

  val traverser = new Traverser {
    override def traverse(tree: Tree): Unit = {
      tree match {
        case q"$_ class $_[..$_] $_(...$_) extends { ..$_ } with ..$parents { $_ => ..$stats }"
          if parents.exists(isEnclosingClass(_)) =>

          val methods = stats.collect {
            case q"$_ def $tname[..$_](...$_): $_ = $_" => tname.toString
          }
          methodss :+= methods

        case _ => ()
      }
        
      super.traverse(tree)
    }
  }

  c.enclosingRun.units.foreach(unit => traverser.traverse(unit.body))

  def namesToTree[A: Liftable](names: Seq[A]): Tree =
    names.foldRight[Tree](q"Seq()")((name, names) => q"$name +: $names")

  namesToTree[Tree](methodss.map(namesToTree[String](_)))
}

Usage:

trait Superclass {
  def aFakeMethod: String = ""

  val methods = myMacro2()
}

class Hello1 extends Superclass {
  def four = ???
  def five = ???
}

class Hello extends Superclass {
  def one(a: Int, b: UserId): String = a.toString + b.id
  def two(c: Option[Int]): String = ""
  def three(d: Seq[Int], f: Set[Int]): String = ""
}
  
val hi = new Hello
println(hi.methods) // List(List("four", "five"), List("one", "two", "three"))
  • Thanks Dmytro. Unfortunately, neither solution would work in our codebase because the Superclass is inherited by over 100 classes around the codebase. Unfortunately, we can't change it to a sealed trait, and naming all the 100 classes is impractical. – mre Nov 22 '20 at 22:00

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