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I have recently been teaching myself ARM assembly on a raspberry PI, and I am now teaching myself x86 assembly on a MacOS X using the NASM compiler. I have written a small program with the file name 'program1.s'. The code is as follows:

global start

section .text
start:
    mov rax, 0xA

Firstly, I'd like to ask, is this the correct syntax for NASM on MacOS X? But my main question is, what NASM command do I use to run this?

Any help on either of these questions would be greatly appreciated.

  • primecubed

1 Answer 1

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The following commands can be used to assemble, link, and then run an assembly code program on macOS.

$ nasm -fmacho64 program1.s         # assemble
$ ld -static program1.o -o program1 # link
$ ./program1                        # run

For the preceding to work, I added instructions for an exit system call (otherwise there is a segmentation fault when running, presumably from the subsequent data in memory being interpreted as instructions to execute).

global start

section .text
start:
    mov rax, 0xA
    mov rax, 0x02000001  ; System call for exit.
    mov rdi, 0x0         ; An exit code of 0.
    syscall
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  • Hi, thanks very much for the response. 'ld program1.o -o program1 -lSystem' did not work, and it responded with 'l: library not found for -lSystem'. Any clue why this is, what actually is lSystem? Also, is 'syscall' the new version of 'int'? Thanks again. Nov 26, 2020 at 21:52
  • @PrimeCubed, I've updated my answer so that a statically linked executable is built, instead of the dynamically linked version in my prior answer. This removes the need to rename start to _main in program1.s, and also removes the need for the -lSystem flag in the call to ld.
    – dannyadam
    Nov 26, 2020 at 22:09
  • Hi, thanks for the response. This works perfectly! I have a few questions though: What is difference between dynamically and statically linked executables? After the compilation has finished, why is the executable 4KB in size, and not just 4 or 5 bytes for each instruction? And why is 'syscall' used, because I thought software interrupts need to be passed a number? Thanks again. Nov 27, 2020 at 19:29
  • @PrimeCubed, dynamically linked executables load library code (e.g., code for printf from the C standard library) at runtime, as opposed to statically linked executables, which would include such code in the executable. However, this distinction is less relevant for your code, since you are not using libraries. This post suggests there is necessary padding that gets added, which would explain the 4KB size you're seeing. The argument for syscall is passed in a register, rax, as opposed to being a direct argument to the instruction.
    – dannyadam
    Nov 27, 2020 at 21:38

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