-3

This is my code:

void list_all_files_subfolder(string& foldername, vector<string>& output) {
    DIR* dir;
    struct dirent* DirEntry;

    if ((dir = opendir(foldername.c_str())) != NULL)
    {
        while ((DirEntry = readdir(dir)) != NULL)
        {
            if (strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".") && strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".."))
            {
                string subfolder(foldername);
                subfolder += "\\";
                subfolder += DirEntry->d_name;
                DIR* subdir;
                if ((subdir = opendir(subfolder.c_str())) != NULL)
                {
                    list_all_files_subfolder(subfolder, output);
                    closedir(subdir);
                }
                else
                {
                    string fullname(foldername);
                    fullname = fullname + '\\' + DirEntry->d_name;
                    output.push_back(fullname);
                }
            }
        }
        closedir(dir);
    }
    else
    {
    }
}

It works. But I want to add code that does not search for files with a .dll extension. Please tell me, how can I add that?

2
  • 3
    If you want everything but dll files, check the end of each file name for dll and skip if dll is found. Note that your operating system may have functions that do the filtering for you. – user4581301 Nov 25 '20 at 15:19
  • 2
    <filesystem> for C++. – sweenish Nov 25 '20 at 15:23
1

You already know how to filter entries on DirEntry->d_name. Simply add an addition check to see if that string ends with ".dll" or not. See How to compare ends of strings in C?. For example:

void list_all_files_subfolder(string& foldername, vector<string>& output) {
    DIR* dir;
    struct dirent* DirEntry;

    if ((dir = opendir(foldername.c_str())) != NULL)
    {
        while ((DirEntry = readdir(dir)) != NULL)
        {
            if (strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".") && strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".."))
            {
                // you can do the filter here...
                /*
                char *dot = strrchr(DirEntry->d_name, '.');
                if (dot && strcmpi(dot, ".dll") == 0)
                    continue;
                */

                string subfolder(foldername);
                subfolder += "\\";
                subfolder += DirEntry->d_name;
                DIR* subdir;
                if ((subdir = opendir(subfolder.c_str())) != NULL)
                {
                    list_all_files_subfolder(subfolder, output);
                    closedir(subdir);
                }
                else
                {
                    // or, you can do the filter here...
                    /*
                    char *dot = strrchr(DirEntry->d_name, '.');
                    if (dot && strcmpi(dot, ".dll") == 0)
                        continue;
                    */

                    string fullname(foldername);
                    fullname = fullname + '\\' + DirEntry->d_name;
                    output.push_back(fullname);
                }
            }
        }
        closedir(dir);
    }
    else
    {
    }
}

On a side note: I would not suggest using opendir() to determine whether the dirent represents a folder or a file. dirent has a d_type member for that purpose, eg:

while ((DirEntry = readdir(dir)) != NULL)
{
    if (DirEntry->d_type == DT_DIR)
    {
        if (strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".") && strcmp(DirEntry->d_name, ".."))
        {
            ...
        }
    }
    else if (DirEntry->d_type == DT_REG)
    {
        ...
    }
}
0

The solution could be rewritten slightly to use a dir_iterator. Supposedly modern C++ should use <filesystem> but let's see how one could do it "from scratch".

Let's work backwards, starting with an example of how we would use an acceptor function, and work our way toward beginning of the example:

template <auto N>
bool ends_with(const std::string& str, const char (&suffix)[N])
{
  constexpr auto suffixLen = N-1;
  return str.size() >= suffixLen && 0 == str.compare(str.size()-suffixLen, suffixLen, suffix, suffixLen);
}

int main()
{
    auto const files = list_files(".", [](auto &path){ return !ends_with(path, ".dll"); });
    for (auto &f : files)
      std::cout << f << "\n";
}
// complete example ends

Then the file list generator would be:

using acceptor_fn = std::function<bool(const std::string &)>;
std::vector<std::string> list_files(dir_contents dir, acceptor_fn accept = {})
{
  std::vector<std::string> result;
  for (const auto &entry : dir) {
    if (entry.getName() == ".") continue;
    if (entry.getName() == "..") continue;
    auto subPath = entry.getFilePath();
    auto subDir = dir_contents(subPath);
    bool const isDir = subDir.is_open();
    if (isDir)
      subPath.push_back(PATH_SEP); // indicate that this is a directory
    if (accept && !accept(subPath)) continue;
    result.emplace_back(subPath);
    if (isDir)
      for (auto &path : list_files(std::move(subDir)))
        result.emplace_back(std::move(path));
  }
  return result;  
}

std::vector<std::string> list_files(const std::string &path, acceptor_fn accept = {})
{ return list_files(dir_contents(path), accept); }

We have dir_contents as a range adaptor: an iterable range for a given path.

class dir_contents {
  dir_iterator m_iter;
public:
  explicit dir_contents(const std::string &path) : m_iter(path) {}
  bool is_open() const { return m_iter.is_open(); }
  dir_iterator begin() { return std::move(m_iter); }
  dir_iterator end() const { return {}; }
};

The "magic" happens in the directory iterator:

template <auto fn>
using deleter_from_fn = std::integral_constant<decltype(fn), fn>;

class dir_iterator {
  dir_entry m_data;
  std::unique_ptr<DIR, deleter_from_fn<&closedir>> m_dir{ open() };

  DIR *open() const { 
    return m_data.hasPath() ? opendir(m_data.getPath().c_str()) : nullptr;
  }
  dir_iterator(std::shared_ptr<const std::string> &&path) : m_data(std::move(path))  {
    if (m_dir) m_data.update(readdir(m_dir.get()));
  }
public:
  dir_iterator() = default;
  dir_iterator(const std::string &path) : 
    dir_iterator(std::make_shared<const std::string>(path)) {}

  const dir_entry &operator*() const { return m_data; }
  const dir_entry* operator->() const { return &m_data; }
  bool is_open() const { return bool(m_dir); }
  bool operator==(const dir_iterator &o) const { return m_data == o.m_data; }
  bool operator!=(const dir_iterator &o) const { return !(m_data == o.m_data); }
  dir_iterator &operator++() {
    m_data.update(readdir(m_dir.get()));
    return *this;
  }
};

Finally, the dir_entry wrapper:

// complete example begins
#include <cassert>
#include <cstring>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <stack>
#include <vector>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <dirent.h>

static constexpr char PATH_SEP = '/';

class dir_entry {
  const std::shared_ptr<const std::string> m_path;
  std::string m_name;
public:
  dir_entry() = default;
  dir_entry(std::shared_ptr<const std::string> &&path) :
    m_path(std::move(path)) { assert(m_path); }
  std::string getFilePath() const {
    if (!*this) return {};
    std::string result;
    result.reserve(m_path->size() + 1 + m_name.size());
    result.append(*m_path);
    result.push_back(PATH_SEP);
    result.append(m_name);
    return result;
  }
  bool hasPath() const { return bool(m_path); }
  const std::string &getPath() const { return *m_path; }
  const std::string &getName() const { return m_name; }
  bool operator==(const dir_entry &o) const {
    return (!bool(*this) && !bool(o))
      || (m_path && o.m_path 
        && (m_path == o.m_path || *m_path == *o.m_path) && m_name == o.m_name);
  }
  explicit operator bool() const { return m_path && !m_name.empty(); }
  void update(dirent* entry) { if (entry) m_name = entry->d_name; else m_name.clear(); }
};
1
  • It says a lot about the language that the "modern C++" version is almost completely unreadable (not your fault) – Asteroids With Wings Nov 26 '20 at 2:12

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