2

I am confused about how Unary Operators work in C for Ones Complement, Logical Negation and preincrementing.

Ones complement works against 0 like this:

int main()
{
    int a;
    a = ~0;          // Ones complement
    printf("%d",a);  // prints as -1.
}

And logical negation works against 0 like this:

int main()
{
    int a;
    a = !0;          // Logical negation
    printf("%d",a);  // prints as 1.
}

But Preincrement against 0 generates a compiler error:

int main()
{
    int a;
    a = ++0;        //pre incrementing 0.  error: non-lvalue in increment
    printf("%d",a); 
}

Why don't all three work considering they are all Unary Operators?

0

3 Answers 3

12

The increment (++) and decrement (--) operators modify the thing that follows them. You can't modify a literal or a constant. In contrast, the ! and ~ operators merely operate on a value, they don't then assign the result anywhere.

Loosely speaking, ++n means n = n + 1; n. That is, "take the value of n, add one to it, write that value back to n, and return the new value as the value of the expression." So ++0 would mean 0 = 0 + 1; 0: "take the value of 0, add one to it, write that back to 0, and return the new value as the result of the expression." Literals and constants cannot be left-hand values (you can't assign to them).

In contrast, ~n means "take the value of n and apply a bitwise NOT operation to it, return the result as the result of the expression". n is unchanged, ~ doesn't write back the updated value to its operand.

So for example:

int n = 0;
int a;
a = ~n;
printf("a = %d, n = %d\n", a, n); // "a = -1, n = 0" -- `n` is unchanged

vs.

int n = 0;
int a;
a = ++n;
printf("a = %d, n = %d\n", a, n); // "a = 1, n = 1" -- `n` is changed

Increment (++) and decrement (--) are just different in that way than for ! or ~ (or, I think, any other unary operator — at least, I can't immediately think of any others that modify their operand).

12
  • but how ~ its modifying the constant?
    – jack
    Jun 28, 2011 at 6:27
  • @jack: no, ~ is not modifying the constant. It's taking the value, operate on the value and return a new value. It doesn't change the thing it operates on itself. Jun 28, 2011 at 6:31
  • 1
    @jack: It isn't. ~n means "take the value of n and apply ~ to it, return the result as the result of the expression" (n is unchanged). In contrast, ++n means "take the value of n, add one to it, write that value back to n, and return the new value as the value of the expression." It's that bit that writes the result back to the operand that's different for ++ and --. Jun 28, 2011 at 6:32
  • yeah i understood now so it performs these operations on RAM and store them back i really understood now after that line ++n=n+1 and ++0=0+1. thank you guys you both are great
    – jack
    Jun 28, 2011 at 6:48
  • 1
    @jack: I don't know why people are downvoting. I will say that it helps when you use punctuation, capitalization, and complete sentences, both in questions and in comments. I mean "gosh i just made it you know i was hurry to leave so it just happened people here worry so much let me change it i was busy moms calling out for lunch so wait a minute i will change it" is pretty...stream-of-consciousness. :-) Also note that StackOverflow is not a discussion site. It's a Q&A site. See the FAQ for the distinction. Jun 28, 2011 at 8:03
4

++ and -- don't just apply an operation to a value, they change the value itself. This behavior wouldn't make much sense on a literal.

The other unary operators that you refer to -- namely ~ and ! -- do not change the value of their operand, they just perform an operation on its value.

2

You're trying to increment a literal value. Since operation x++; is a synonym for x=x+1; this means you are trying to set a new value for 0, which is not a variable.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.