7

My day job is working with safety-critical embedded systems. I also do some teaching/consultancy with customers on the topic of writing safe embedded code. The question of programming languages always comes up and we compare C, D, Ada, Erlang, Rust, etc.

There is one exercise that I often use for demonstration purposes. It's a simple, two-threaded program, with each thread picking up a global variable (initialised to 0), adding 1 to it and replacing it ten times. We then speculate about the maximum value that the variable can have at the end (20) and its minimum value (we normally decide on 10 before we use a formal proof to shew that it can be 2).

One thing I demonstrate is that the C version of the program compiles (dangerous), but the Rust version doesn't (good!). Today I have written the Ada version and have had two surprises on which I would ask for comments. First, my program:

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is
   task AddTenA;
   task AddTenB;

   --  Global variable

   x : Natural := 0;

   finished : array (0 .. 1) of Natural := (0, 0);

   --  Make sure that the compiler doesn't remove
   --  all the addition.

   pragma Volatile (x);

   task body AddTenA is
      y : Integer;
   begin
      for I in 1 .. 10 loop
         y := x + 1;
         x := y;
      end loop;
      finished (0) := 1;
   end AddTenA;
   
   task body AddTenB is
      y : Integer;
   begin
      for I in 1 .. 10 loop
         y := x + 1;
         x := y;
      end loop;
      finished (1) := 1;
   end AddTenB;
   
begin

   while finished (0) + finished (1) < 2 loop
      delay 0.001;
   end loop;

   Put_Line (Integer'Image (x));

end Main;

And yes, I am familiar with Protected Objects and with Task rendezvous, but that wasn't the point of the program.

My two surprises:

  1. Even with a complete alphabet of compiler flags (-fstack-check, -gnata, -gnato13, -gnatf, -gnatwa, -g, -gnatVa,-gnaty3abcdefhiklmnoOprstux, -gnatwe, -gnat2012, -Wall,-O2) I do not get a compiler warning. Rust tells me that the global variable has no unique owner and therefore it's not going to compile the Rust version of the program for me. I understand that SPARK doesn't handle Tasks, and so Ada will generate no warning that I have a potentially dangerous race condition in the code. This surprises me in a language such as Ada. Have I missed a clever compiler or runtime option?

  2. When I execute the equivalent C program, the most common output is 20, but, when I run it many times, I get a scattering of values, typically from about 8 to 20. I have run the Ada program (above) 500,000 times and have only ever got values of 10 and 20 (with no values in between, and with 99.9% of the outputs being 20). This would indicate that there is some fundamental difference between C's pthreading and Ada's Tasking. What is that? Are Ada Tasks not mapped to pthreads? Is there an implicit round-robin scheduling in the Ada version?

Going around the addition loop 10 times presumably doesn't take long, so I have tried increasing the loop count to 100 to see whether the Task could be interrupted more often. Then I get just 200 and 100.

  • 1
    Just an info note (kind of FYI thing): Rust (and SPARK) detects "data races" which are multi-threaded accesses to non atomic data that can result in erroneous values. "Race conditions" are logical errors that allow for your data to be in valid states you don't expect. Both Rust and SPARK can miss race conditions at compile time (though SPARK does have the advantage that your contracts will most likely catch it if written well). – Jere Nov 27 '20 at 1:02
  • How many processors do you have on your system? Modern system typically have multiple processors, and on such a system, if >= 3 processors are available, each of your tasks will usually run on its own processor and there would be no task scheduling. In that case, the race should be apparent and values < 20 common. On a single processor, the default scheduling policy would be for one task to run to completion before another gets the processor, so one would always expect 20. I see now your comment on using Zoom to confuse this further. – Jeffrey R. Carter Nov 27 '20 at 8:39
  • I can remember a time when "how many processors?" was a simple question. Now we distinguish between processors and cores and Intel throws in Hyperthreading to keep us on our toes. Come back 8080 (I have one in my desk drawer as I type), all is forgiven. Anyway, I have 4 processors and 2 cores. And I use Zoom and other multi-threaded processor-hogs to load the system. My remaining surprise is that, with the C and Python equivalents of this program I get a smattering of values typically between 10 and 20 but sometimes as low as 8. With the Ada version I only ever seem to get either 10 or 20. – Chris Hobbs Nov 27 '20 at 16:47
  • My first thought is the compiler is likely unrolling your loop, and perhaps even saving the final assignment to x until the end. You might try compiling in debug mode if you didn't already. – Patrick Nov 27 '20 at 17:58
6

Using GNAT Community 2020 I get the following diagnostics using SPARK:

package threads with
   SPARK_Mode
is
   X : Natural := 0;
   pragma Volatile (X);

   task type AddTen with
   Global => (in_out => X);
end threads;

pragma Ada_2012;
package body threads with
SPARK_Mode
is

   ------------
   -- AddTen --
   ------------

   task body AddTen is
      Y : Integer;
   begin
      for I in 1 .. 10 loop
         Y := X + 1;
         X := Y;
      end loop;
   end AddTen;

end threads;

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;
with threads; use threads;

procedure Main with SPARK_Mode is
begin
   declare
      A : AddTen;
      B : AddTen;
   begin
      null;
   end;
   Put_Line(X'Image);
end Main;

I get the following messages from SPARK when examining all sources:

gnatprove -PD:\Ada\Stack_Overflow\Race\race.gpr -j0 --mode=flow --ide-progress-bar -U Phase 1 of 2: generation of Global contracts ... threads.adb:14:15: volatile object cannot appear in this context (SPARK RM 7.1.3(12)) main.adb:12:13: volatile object cannot appear in this context (SPARK RM 7.1.3(11)) gnatprove: error during generation of Global contracts

It appears to me that SPARK does indeed identify this use of a volatile object as being improper.

When I simplify the program, change volatile to atomic and eliminate the use of SPARK as below:

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is
   X : Natural := 0;
   pragma Atomic (X);

   task type AddTen;
   task body AddTen is
      Y : Integer;
   begin
      for I in 1 .. 100 loop
         Y := X + 1;
         X := Y;
      end loop;
   end AddTen;
begin
   declare
      A, B : AddTen;
   begin
      null;
   end;
  
   Put_Line(X'Image);
end Main;

I consistently get a result of 200.

Note that running the tasks within an inner block causes outer block of the main procedure to wait until the inner block completes, and the inner block only completes when both tasks complete.

When I force longer execution by changing the upper loop range to 10000 I get a mixture of numbers such as 15509, 16318, 15283, 14555.

  • You are (of course) right: I now get the same error message. I was going by a comment in "Building High Integrity Applications with SPARK" by John W McComick and Peter Chapin which says, "The version of SPARK 2014 available at the time of this writing [2015] does not support any of Ada tasking features...". – Chris Hobbs Nov 26 '20 at 21:30
  • And yes, using larger numbers in the loop gets the thread to run long enough to get scheduling actions. For the C program, I don't need to go above 10. I've just run it 100,000 times: 10 -> 9 times 11 -> 1 times 12 -> 1 times 13 -> 1 times 15 -> 4 times 16 -> 2 times 17 -> 1 times 18 -> 1 times 19 -> 1 times 20 -> 99979 times – Chris Hobbs Nov 26 '20 at 21:38
4

Absent round-robin scheduling, which isn’t the default (it’s usually FIFO within priorities), why would the tasks swap? There are no scheduling points there. I should add, I’m more used to scheduling with Ravenscar RTSs on single-processor MCUs, so I’ve probably got the wrong idea here!

That would result in 200 every time, clearly not the case (by the way, very similar results with a loop count of 10_000_000! but I always see a result of 10000000). I suppose there may be some scheduling impact of the delay in the main program.

I tried using just

pragma Task_Dispatching_Policy 
  (Round_Robin_Within_Priorities);

with no effect.

Then

Ada.Dispatching.Round_Robin.Set_Quantum 
  (System.Default_Priority,
   Ada.Real_Time.Microseconds (2));

which gives the error

Round_Robin is not supported in this configuration

(the configuration being macOS/GCC 10.1.0).

Then

pragma Atomic (x);

which does indeed make the difference you were expecting.

Explanations welcome!

  • 2
    Regarding scheduling points, I should have mentioned that I deliberately run a video or something at higher priority when I do the test. Zoom is particularly good/bad for this: when I give a demonstration while on a Zoom call, I get a much wider spread in values than I do with any other program. It also takes almost twice as long to run the demonstration as when I'm not on Zoom. I assume Zoom much launch a lot of high-priority threads and I'm running on a fairly slow laptop. – Chris Hobbs Nov 26 '20 at 22:36
  • The program is actually erroneous, see ARM 9.10(11) - though there appears to be a clash between this and ARM C.6(17)! – Simon Wright Nov 27 '20 at 9:04
  • So, if I have understood, according to ARM 9.10(11) my program is erroneous (good, because it is). According to "Classification of Errors" that should be detected "prior to run time" (i.e., by the compiler). But it wasn't, until SPARK was turned on. – Chris Hobbs Nov 27 '20 at 14:25
  • In Ada, "erroneous" is a term of art. ARM 1.1.5(10): "In addition to bounded errors, the language rules define certain kinds of errors as leading to erroneous execution. Like bounded errors, the implementation need not detect such errors either prior to or during run time. Unlike bounded errors, there is no language-specified bound on the possible effect of erroneous execution; the effect is in general not predictable." Very like C "undefined behaviour". – Simon Wright Nov 27 '20 at 16:18
  • 1
    Yes, I've just tried out the version with the System.Atomic_Operations.Modular_Arithmetic. It ruins the problem by working consistently! – Chris Hobbs Nov 29 '20 at 21:55

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