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I read on multiple StackOverflow answers that C and C++ do not have graphics libraries as part of its Standard Library, then how do third party libraries implement Graphical User Interface?

Suppose I am a developer who wants to create a library that can draw shapes on the screen, how do I even make such a library without using any other third-party library? Once you have a basic pixel drawing function, you can build on top of it many other functions like function for drawing squares, circles, etc with basic logic but how do you create that initial pixel drawing function that C and C++ do not understand?

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  • third party libraries are for specific purpose like graphics/motion/scientific calculations/security algorithms etc... and list goes on and on...
    – csavvy
    Nov 27, 2020 at 7:09
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    This "initial" pixel drawing function is usually provided by your operating system. See, for example, this answer. Nov 27, 2020 at 7:10
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    C and C++ are frugal languages, that make minimal assumptions on the environment. This is what allows them to run on a wide variety of hosts, from embedded controllers to mainframes, and everything in between. Many of those platforms may not even have a display, let alone one capable of graphics. And those which do have vastly different features and low level controls. Because of all this, it made more sense to leave graphics support to dedicated, more narrowly targeted libraries.
    – dxiv
    Nov 27, 2020 at 7:42

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How can third-party libraries do things that the standard library can't do?

At the lowest level, they use APIs provided by the operating system.

In most cases, there is typically a stack of libraries with increasing levels of abstraction. On top of operating system API, there is often a system libraries (such as glibc, libDRM). On top of system libraries, there is often a portable cross-platform abstraction (such as libuv, Mesa3D). On top of those, there are more complex libraries and frameworks that combine multiple interfaces (such as a web server framework, SDL).

Suppose I am a developer who wants to create a library that can draw shapes on the screen, how do I even make such a library without using any other third-party library?

Since using operating system API's is operating system specific, let's use Linux as an example.

You have a choice between multiple graphics API's. Perhaps most commonly used are the framebuffer device, and direct rendering manager.

However, if you want your program to be windowed with other graphical programs, then there must be co-ordination between the programs. This is the job of a display server (typically Xorg). Most graphical Linux programs do not interact with the graphics APIs directly but instead through such server. If you wish to not use a client library provided by the server, then you must re-implement their client side protocol.

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  • Worth adding that OpenGL and Vulcan support graphical hardware acceleration by coordinating with a GPU and the Direct Rendering Manager (libDRM) is used to move framebuffers between user and kernel space.
    – doron
    Nov 27, 2020 at 8:09

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