2

I have a table like this:

id | name | salary
------------------
1  | guy1 | 1000
2  | guy2 | 750
3  | guy3 | 400
4  | guy4 | 1000
5  | guy5 | 925
6  | guy6 | 900

I need to take the highest salaries (in this case 2 * 1000) and the lowest (in this case 1 * 400), and return the difference between highest and lowest calculated like this:

1000 * 2 - 400 * 1 = 1600

difference
----------
1600

I tried to filter the table where salaries are highest and lowest but failed.

If the table is empty the result should be 0.

1

You could use dense_rank to find the lowest and the highest salary, and then self join those results, sum them, and subtract:

SELECT SUM(CASE sal_desc WHEN 1 THEN salary END) - 
       SUM(CASE sal_asc WHEN 1 THEN salary END)
FROM   (SELECT salary, 
               DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY salary ASC)  AS sal_asc,
               DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY salary DESC) AS sal_desc
        FROM   mytable) t
1

One method is to aggregate twice:

select sum(case when seqnum_desc = 1 then sum_salary
                else - sum_salary
           end) as diff
from (select salary, sum(salary) as sum_salary,
             row_number() over (order by salary asc) as seqnum_asc,
             row_number() over (order by salary desc) as seqnum_desc
      from t
      group by salary
     ) t
where 1 in (seqnum_asc, seqnum_desc)
1

Postgres 13 adds the WITH TIES clause to include all peers of the nth row:

If you have an index on salary, this will be as fast as it gets. Much faster than involving window functions:

SELECT COALESCE(sum(salary), 0) AS diff
FROM  (
   (  -- parentheses required
   SELECT salary
   FROM   tbl
   ORDER  BY salary DESC
   FETCH  FIRST 1 ROWS WITH TIES
   )
   UNION ALL
   (
   SELECT salary * -1
   FROM   tbl
   ORDER  BY salary
   FETCH  FIRST 1 ROWS WITH TIES
   )
   ) sub;

db<>fiddle here

Postgres can take the first and last values from an index on (salary) directly. Quasi-instantaneous result, no matter how big the table might be.

COALESCE() to get 0 instead of NULL when the table is empty.

Why the extra parentheses? The manual:

(ORDER BY and LIMIT can be attached to a subexpression if it is enclosed in parentheses. Without parentheses, these clauses will be taken to apply to the result of the UNION, not to its right-hand input expression.)

See:

This is assuming salary is NOT NULL, else append NULLS LAST to the descending order. See:

1

You can do:

select
  (select sum(salary) from t where salary = (select max(salary) from t))
  -
  (select sum(salary) from t where salary = (select min(salary) from t));

Result:

1600

See running example at DB Fiddle.

2
  • Thanks for the answer. It's almost right, expect the count(*) * sum(salary). I changed it to count(*) + sum(salary) and it gave me almost the right answer, insteed of 1600 it gives me 1601. And in case of empty table it should output 0. Nov 28 '20 at 12:02
  • @MikeEhrmantraut - Fixed. As you can see, the answer was actually simpler. Nov 28 '20 at 15:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.